Calculating the peak skin dose resulting from fluoroscopically guided interventions. Part I

Methods

A. Kyle Jones, Alexander Pasciak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While direct measurement of the peak skin dose resulting from a fluoroscopically-guided procedure is possible, the decision must be made a priori at additional cost and time. It is most often the case that the need for accurate knowledge of the peak skin dose is realized only after a procedure has been completed, or after a suspected reaction has been discovered. Part I of this review article discusses methods for calculating the peak skin dose across a range of clinical scenarios. In some cases, a wealth of data are available, while in other cases few data are available and additional data must be measured in order to estimate the peak skin dose. Data may be gathered from a dose report, the DICOM headers of images, or from staff and physician interviews. After data are gathered, specific steps must be followed to convert dose metrics, such as the reference point air kerma (Ka,r) or the kerma area product (KAP), into peak skin dose. These steps require knowledge of other related factors, such as the f-factor and the backscatter factor, tables of which are provided in this manuscript. Sources of error and the impact of these errors on the accuracy of the final estimate of the peak skin dose are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-244
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Skin
dosage
Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)
headers
physicians
Research Design
estimates
Air
Interviews
Physicians
Costs and Cost Analysis
costs
Costs
air
products

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiation
  • Instrumentation
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Calculating the peak skin dose resulting from fluoroscopically guided interventions. Part I : Methods. / Jones, A. Kyle; Pasciak, Alexander.

In: Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.01.2011, p. 231-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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