Can failure on adaptive locomotor tasks independently predict incident mobility disability?

Nandini Deshpande, E. Metter, Jack Guralnik, Luigi Ferrucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined whether inability to perform adaptive locomotor tests predicts self-reported incident mobility disability. InCHIANTI study participants (N = 611; age, 50Y85 yrs) who could walk 7 m at self-selected speed and who had no selfreported mobility disability at baseline were included. The ability to complete four adaptive locomotor tests was assessed: fast walking, walking on a narrow path, crossing obstacles while walking, and talking while walking. Mobility disability was recorded again at 3-yr follow-up. Failure in the fast-walking and narrow-path walking tests predicted approximately 2.5 times likelihood of reporting incident mobility disability (P = 0.009 and P = 0.011, respectively). Failure in the obstacle-crossing test predicted approximately two times likelihood of reporting incident mobility disability; however, this result did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.077). Failure in talking while walking did not predict incident mobility disability. Those who failed both the fast-walking and narrow-path walking tests were almost nine times as likely to report incident mobility disability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)704-709
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume92
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Medicine(all)

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Can failure on adaptive locomotor tasks independently predict incident mobility disability? / Deshpande, Nandini; Metter, E.; Guralnik, Jack; Ferrucci, Luigi.

In: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 92, No. 8, 01.08.2013, p. 704-709.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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