Can Inexperienced Listeners Hear Who Is Singing? The Role of Onset Cues

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective/Hypothesis: This study sought to determine whether the acoustic information contained in the onset of phonation can improve the ability to discriminate voices across pitch. Study Design: This study was a repeated-measures factorial design. Methods: Listeners heard two singers producing /ɑ/ at the same pitch and an unknown singer producing /ɑ/ at a different pitch. Listener's identified which singer was the unknown singer. Two baritones and two tenors were recorded producing /ɑ/ at the pitches C3, E3, G3, B3, D4, and F4. Two sopranos and two mezzo-sopranos were recorded producing /ɑ/ at the pitches C4, E4, G4, B4, D5, and F5. For each group of stimuli, male and female, all possible pairs of singers were constructed for the lowest pitch. The unknown singer was varied across the remaining pitches. All stimulus combinations were presented with and without onset cues. Results: In general, the inclusion of onset information affected listeners’ ability to discriminate singers across pitch. When the pitch interval was small, a 3rd or a 5th, onset information improved the ability to correctly discriminate singers across pitch. This effect was greater for female voices than for male voices. However, when the pitch interval was larger, a 7th, 9th, or 11th, the onset information either had no effect, as was seen in the female voices, or had a negative effect, as was seen in the male voices. Conclusion: Voice onset information affects voice discrimination in certain circumstances, but cannot be used by inexperienced listeners as a consistent cue to improve singer discrimination across all pitch intervals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)466-473
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Voice
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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Singing
Cues
Aptitude
Phonation
Acoustics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

Can Inexperienced Listeners Hear Who Is Singing? The Role of Onset Cues. / Erickson, Mary.

In: Journal of Voice, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.07.2018, p. 466-473.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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