Can small lesions induce language reorganization as large lesions do?

Fernando Maestú, Cristobal Saldaña, Carlos Amo, Mercedes González-Hidalgo, Alberto Fernandez, Santiago Fernandez, Pedro Mata, Andrew Papanicolaou, Tomas Ortiz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Shift of the cortical mechanisms of language from the usually dominant left to the non-dominant right hemisphere has been demonstrated in the presence of large brain lesions. Here, we report a similar phenomenon in a patient with a cavernoma over the anterolateral superior temporal gyrus associated with epilepsy. Language mapping was performed by two complementary procedures, magnetoencephalography, and electrocorticography. The maps, indicated right temporal lobe dominance for receptive language and left frontal lobe dominance for expressive language. These results indicate that a small lesion, associated with epilepsy, may produce selective shifting of receptive language mechanisms as large lesions have been known to produce.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-438
Number of pages6
JournalBrain and Language
Volume89
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

reorganization
Language
language
epilepsy
Temporal Lobe
Epilepsy
Magnetoencephalography
Frontal Lobe
brain
Reorganization
Lesion
Receptive Language
Brain
Right Hemisphere
Brain Lesion
Expressive Language

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Maestú, F., Saldaña, C., Amo, C., González-Hidalgo, M., Fernandez, A., Fernandez, S., ... Ortiz, T. (2004). Can small lesions induce language reorganization as large lesions do? Brain and Language, 89(3), 433-438. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2004.01.002

Can small lesions induce language reorganization as large lesions do? / Maestú, Fernando; Saldaña, Cristobal; Amo, Carlos; González-Hidalgo, Mercedes; Fernandez, Alberto; Fernandez, Santiago; Mata, Pedro; Papanicolaou, Andrew; Ortiz, Tomas.

In: Brain and Language, Vol. 89, No. 3, 01.01.2004, p. 433-438.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maestú, F, Saldaña, C, Amo, C, González-Hidalgo, M, Fernandez, A, Fernandez, S, Mata, P, Papanicolaou, A & Ortiz, T 2004, 'Can small lesions induce language reorganization as large lesions do?', Brain and Language, vol. 89, no. 3, pp. 433-438. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2004.01.002
Maestú F, Saldaña C, Amo C, González-Hidalgo M, Fernandez A, Fernandez S et al. Can small lesions induce language reorganization as large lesions do? Brain and Language. 2004 Jan 1;89(3):433-438. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2004.01.002
Maestú, Fernando ; Saldaña, Cristobal ; Amo, Carlos ; González-Hidalgo, Mercedes ; Fernandez, Alberto ; Fernandez, Santiago ; Mata, Pedro ; Papanicolaou, Andrew ; Ortiz, Tomas. / Can small lesions induce language reorganization as large lesions do?. In: Brain and Language. 2004 ; Vol. 89, No. 3. pp. 433-438.
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