Cancer prevention and screening practices of siblings of childhood cancer survivors

A report from the childhood cancer survivor study

David Buchbinder, Ann C. Mertens, Lonnie K. Zeltzer, Wendy Leisenring, Pam Goodman, E. Anne Lown, Melissa A. Alderfer, Christopher Recklitis, Kevin Oeffinger, Gregory Armstrong, Melissa Hudson, Leslie L. Robison, Jacqueline Casillas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To compare the skin and breast/cervical cancer prevention/screening practices of adult siblings of childhood cancer survivors with controls and to identify modifying factors for these practices. Methods: Cross-sectional, self-report data from 2,588 adult siblings of 5+ year survivors of childhood cancer were analyzed to assess cancer prevention/screening practices. Two age, sex, and race/ethnicity-matched samples (N = 5,915 and N = 37,789) of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System participants served as the comparison populations. Sociodemographic and cancer-related data were explored as modifying factors for sibling cancer prevention/screening practices through multivariable logistic regression. Results: Compared with controls, siblings were more likely to practice skin cancer prevention behaviors: use of protective clothing [OR, 2.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.39-3.39], use of shade (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.88-2.36), use of sunscreen (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.14-1.40), and wearing a hat (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.58-1.98). No differences were noted for breast/cervical cancer screening including mammography and Pap testing. Having less than a high school education and lack of health insurance were associated with diminished cancer prevention/screening behaviors. Survivor diagnosis, treatment intensity, adverse health, chronic health conditions, and second cancers were not associated with sibling cancer prevention/screening behaviors. Conclusions: Siblings of cancer survivors report greater skin cancer prevention practices when compared with controls; however, no differences were noted for breast/cervical cancer screening practices. Access to care and lack of education may be associated with decreased cancer prevention/screening behaviors. Interventions are needed to address these barriers. Impact: Research should be directed at understanding the impact of the cancer experience on sibling health behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1078-1088
Number of pages11
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

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Early Detection of Cancer
Survivors
Siblings
Neoplasms
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Skin Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Protective Clothing
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Education
Sunscreening Agents
Second Primary Neoplasms
Health Behavior
Health
Mammography
Health Insurance
Self Report
Logistic Models
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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Cancer prevention and screening practices of siblings of childhood cancer survivors : A report from the childhood cancer survivor study. / Buchbinder, David; Mertens, Ann C.; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.; Leisenring, Wendy; Goodman, Pam; Lown, E. Anne; Alderfer, Melissa A.; Recklitis, Christopher; Oeffinger, Kevin; Armstrong, Gregory; Hudson, Melissa; Robison, Leslie L.; Casillas, Jacqueline.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 21, No. 7, 01.07.2012, p. 1078-1088.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buchbinder, D, Mertens, AC, Zeltzer, LK, Leisenring, W, Goodman, P, Lown, EA, Alderfer, MA, Recklitis, C, Oeffinger, K, Armstrong, G, Hudson, M, Robison, LL & Casillas, J 2012, 'Cancer prevention and screening practices of siblings of childhood cancer survivors: A report from the childhood cancer survivor study', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 1078-1088. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-1095
Buchbinder, David ; Mertens, Ann C. ; Zeltzer, Lonnie K. ; Leisenring, Wendy ; Goodman, Pam ; Lown, E. Anne ; Alderfer, Melissa A. ; Recklitis, Christopher ; Oeffinger, Kevin ; Armstrong, Gregory ; Hudson, Melissa ; Robison, Leslie L. ; Casillas, Jacqueline. / Cancer prevention and screening practices of siblings of childhood cancer survivors : A report from the childhood cancer survivor study. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 7. pp. 1078-1088.
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abstract = "Background: To compare the skin and breast/cervical cancer prevention/screening practices of adult siblings of childhood cancer survivors with controls and to identify modifying factors for these practices. Methods: Cross-sectional, self-report data from 2,588 adult siblings of 5+ year survivors of childhood cancer were analyzed to assess cancer prevention/screening practices. Two age, sex, and race/ethnicity-matched samples (N = 5,915 and N = 37,789) of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System participants served as the comparison populations. Sociodemographic and cancer-related data were explored as modifying factors for sibling cancer prevention/screening practices through multivariable logistic regression. Results: Compared with controls, siblings were more likely to practice skin cancer prevention behaviors: use of protective clothing [OR, 2.85; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 2.39-3.39], use of shade (OR, 2.11; 95{\%} CI, 1.88-2.36), use of sunscreen (OR, 1.27; 95{\%} CI, 1.14-1.40), and wearing a hat (OR, 1.77; 95{\%} CI, 1.58-1.98). No differences were noted for breast/cervical cancer screening including mammography and Pap testing. Having less than a high school education and lack of health insurance were associated with diminished cancer prevention/screening behaviors. Survivor diagnosis, treatment intensity, adverse health, chronic health conditions, and second cancers were not associated with sibling cancer prevention/screening behaviors. Conclusions: Siblings of cancer survivors report greater skin cancer prevention practices when compared with controls; however, no differences were noted for breast/cervical cancer screening practices. Access to care and lack of education may be associated with decreased cancer prevention/screening behaviors. Interventions are needed to address these barriers. Impact: Research should be directed at understanding the impact of the cancer experience on sibling health behaviors.",
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AU - Buchbinder, David

AU - Mertens, Ann C.

AU - Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

AU - Leisenring, Wendy

AU - Goodman, Pam

AU - Lown, E. Anne

AU - Alderfer, Melissa A.

AU - Recklitis, Christopher

AU - Oeffinger, Kevin

AU - Armstrong, Gregory

AU - Hudson, Melissa

AU - Robison, Leslie L.

AU - Casillas, Jacqueline

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