Cancer screening behaviors among Latina women

The role of the latino male

Michelle Treviño, Lina Jandorf, Zoran Bursac, Deborah O. Erwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to determine, through a community-based breast and cervical cancer intervention program, the impact Latino males may have on Latinas and their cancer screening behaviors. This report includes data collected from 163 Latino males recruited throughout rural Arkansas and four New York City boroughs for the Esperanza y Vida program, designed to evaluate cancer screening outcomes among Latinas and address their health care needs and cancer control challenges. Basic demographics and identical pre- and postprogram knowledge surveys were collected and analyzed using SPSS 15.0 and SAS 9.2. Results from this study suggest Latino men have little knowledge about breast or cervical cancer screening and are unfamiliar with their partners' screening histories. Male participants were also less likely to complete program assessment forms (pre, post, demographic questionnaires) and more likely to commit response errors (i.e. multiple answers, illegible responses). These findings suggest that including males in education programs for Latinas may be a crucial component in decreasing cancers among this segment of the population. The further development of programs such as Esperanza y Vida, that empowers Latino males, will be important in reducing the unequal burden of breast and cervical cancers for Latinas. It is important to continue including Latino men in these types of studies because the impact of their role on Latina's health remains understudied, unknown, and misunderstood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)694-700
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

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Early Detection of Cancer
Hispanic Americans
cancer
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
SPSS
Demography
Program Development
health care
Neoplasms
questionnaire
history
health
Delivery of Health Care
Education
community
education
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cancer screening behaviors among Latina women : The role of the latino male. / Treviño, Michelle; Jandorf, Lina; Bursac, Zoran; Erwin, Deborah O.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 37, No. 3, 01.06.2012, p. 694-700.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Treviño, Michelle ; Jandorf, Lina ; Bursac, Zoran ; Erwin, Deborah O. / Cancer screening behaviors among Latina women : The role of the latino male. In: Journal of Community Health. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 3. pp. 694-700.
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