Candida albicans biofilm formation in a new in vivo rat model

Markéta Řičicová, Soňa Kucharíková, Helene Tournu, Jelle Hendrix, Helena Bujdáková, Johan Van Eldere, Katrien Lagrou, Patrick Van Dijck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Device-associated microbial growth, including Candida biofilms, represents more than half of all human microbial infections and, despite a relatively small risk of implant-associated diseases, this type of infection usually leads to high morbidity, increased health-care costs and prolonged antimicrobial therapy. Animal models are needed to elucidate the complex host-pathogen interactions that occur during the development of attached and structured biofilm populations. We describe here a new in vivo model to study Candida biofilm, based on the avascular implantation of small catheters in rats. Polyurethane biomaterials challenged with Candida cells were placed underneath the skin of immunosuppressed animals following only minor surgery. The model allowed the study of up to ten biofilms at once, and the recovery of mature biofilms from 2 days after implantation. The adhering inoculum was adjusted to the standard threshold of positive diagnosis of fungal infection in materials recovered from patients. Wild-type biofilms were mainly formed of hyphal cells, and they were unevenly distributed across the catheter length as observed in infected materials in clinical cases. The hyphal multilayered structure of the biofilms of wild-type strains was observed by confocal microscopy and compared to the monolayer of yeast or hyphal cells of two well-known biofilm-deficient strains, efg1Δ/efg1Δ cph1Δ/cph1Δ and bcr1Δ/bcr1Δ, respectively. The subcutaneous Candida biofilm model relies on the use of implanted catheters with accessible, fast and minor surgery to the animals. This model can be used to characterize the ability of antimicrobial agents to eliminate biofilms, and to evaluate the prophylactic effect of antifungal drugs and biomaterial coatings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)909-919
Number of pages11
JournalMicrobiology
Volume156
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 12 2010

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Biofilms
Candida albicans
Candida
Minor Surgical Procedures
Catheters
Biocompatible Materials
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Polyurethanes
Mycoses
Anti-Infective Agents
Infection
Confocal Microscopy
Health Care Costs
Animal Models
Yeasts
Morbidity
Equipment and Supplies
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology

Cite this

Řičicová, M., Kucharíková, S., Tournu, H., Hendrix, J., Bujdáková, H., Van Eldere, J., ... Van Dijck, P. (2010). Candida albicans biofilm formation in a new in vivo rat model. Microbiology, 156(3), 909-919. https://doi.org/10.1099/mic.0.033530-0

Candida albicans biofilm formation in a new in vivo rat model. / Řičicová, Markéta; Kucharíková, Soňa; Tournu, Helene; Hendrix, Jelle; Bujdáková, Helena; Van Eldere, Johan; Lagrou, Katrien; Van Dijck, Patrick.

In: Microbiology, Vol. 156, No. 3, 12.03.2010, p. 909-919.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Řičicová, M, Kucharíková, S, Tournu, H, Hendrix, J, Bujdáková, H, Van Eldere, J, Lagrou, K & Van Dijck, P 2010, 'Candida albicans biofilm formation in a new in vivo rat model', Microbiology, vol. 156, no. 3, pp. 909-919. https://doi.org/10.1099/mic.0.033530-0
Řičicová M, Kucharíková S, Tournu H, Hendrix J, Bujdáková H, Van Eldere J et al. Candida albicans biofilm formation in a new in vivo rat model. Microbiology. 2010 Mar 12;156(3):909-919. https://doi.org/10.1099/mic.0.033530-0
Řičicová, Markéta ; Kucharíková, Soňa ; Tournu, Helene ; Hendrix, Jelle ; Bujdáková, Helena ; Van Eldere, Johan ; Lagrou, Katrien ; Van Dijck, Patrick. / Candida albicans biofilm formation in a new in vivo rat model. In: Microbiology. 2010 ; Vol. 156, No. 3. pp. 909-919.
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