Candida-bacteria interactions

Their impact on human disease

Devon L. Allison, Hubertine Willems, J. A.M.S. Jayatilake, Vincent M. Bruno, Brian Peters, Mark E. Shirtliff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Candida species are the most common infectious fungal species in humans; out of the approximately 150 known species, Candida albicans is the leading pathogenic species, largely affecting immunocompromised individuals. Apart from its role as the primary etiology for various types of candidiasis, C. albicans is known to contribute to polymicrobial infections. Polymicrobial interactions, particularly between C. albicans and bacterial species, have gained recent interest in which polymicrobial biofilm virulence mechanisms have been studied including adhesion, invasion, quorum sensing, and development of antimicrobial resistance. These trans-kingdom interactions, either synergistic or antagonistic, may help modulate the virulence and pathogenicity of both Candida and bacteria while uniquely impacting the pathogen-host immune response. As antibiotic and antifungal resistance increases, there is a great need to explore the intermicrobial cross-talk with a focus on the treatment of Candida-associated polymicrobial infections. This article explores the current literature on the interactions between Candida and clinically important bacteria and evaluates these interactions in the context of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and disease management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberVMBF-0030-2016
JournalMicrobiology Spectrum
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Candida
Candida albicans
Bacteria
Virulence
bacterium
Coinfection
virulence
Quorum Sensing
Candidiasis
Biofilms
Microbial Drug Resistance
Disease Management
etiology
pathogenicity
immune response
adhesion
antibiotics
biofilm
pathogen
human disease

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Ecology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Genetics
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Cell Biology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Allison, D. L., Willems, H., Jayatilake, J. A. M. S., Bruno, V. M., Peters, B., & Shirtliff, M. E. (2016). Candida-bacteria interactions: Their impact on human disease. Microbiology Spectrum, 4(3), [VMBF-0030-2016]. https://doi.org/10.1128/microbiolspec.VMBF-0030-2016

Candida-bacteria interactions : Their impact on human disease. / Allison, Devon L.; Willems, Hubertine; Jayatilake, J. A.M.S.; Bruno, Vincent M.; Peters, Brian; Shirtliff, Mark E.

In: Microbiology Spectrum, Vol. 4, No. 3, VMBF-0030-2016, 01.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allison, Devon L. ; Willems, Hubertine ; Jayatilake, J. A.M.S. ; Bruno, Vincent M. ; Peters, Brian ; Shirtliff, Mark E. / Candida-bacteria interactions : Their impact on human disease. In: Microbiology Spectrum. 2016 ; Vol. 4, No. 3.
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