Capillarization in skeletal muscle of rats with cardiac hypertrophy

Hans Degens, Rebecca K. Anderson, Stephen Alway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Exercise intolerance during chronic heart failure (CHF) is localized mainly in skeletal muscle. A decreased capillarization may impair exchange of oxygen between capillaries and muscle tissue and in this way contribute to exercise intolerance. We assessed changes in capillary supply in plantaris and diaphragm muscles of a rat aorta-caval fistula (ACF) preparation, a volume overload model for CHF. Methods: An ACF was created under equithesin anesthesia. Plantaris and diaphragm muscles were removed 6 wk postsurgery and examined for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content and capillary supply. Results: Cardiac hypertrophy was 96% (P < 0.002) after ACF. The Type IIb MyHC content of the plantaris muscles increased (33.9 ± 3.3 vs 49.8 ± 3.8%; mean ± SEM) at the expense of Type IIa MyHC (17.6 ± 1.8 vs 11.2 ± 1.7%) in ACF rats (P < 0.05). In the diaphragm, the number of Type I (32.1 ± 2.3 vs 40.6 ± 2.7%) and IIb fibers (40.6 ± 1.9 vs 49.6 ± 3.6%) increased at the expense of Type IIa fibers (26.8 ± 2.5 vs 9.4 ± 0.9%) (P < 0.05). The capillary number per fiber did not change, and this indicated that no capillary loss occurred with ACF. Also, the capillary density was maintained in the diaphragm and plantaris muscles of ACF rats. Furthermore, the coupling between fiber type, size, and metabolic type of surrounding fibers, with the capillary supply to a fiber, was maintained in rats with an ACF. Conclusion: The cardiac hypertrophy induced by volume overload seems adequate to prevent atrophy and changes in the microcirculation of limb and diaphragm muscles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-266
Number of pages9
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Venae Cavae
Cardiomegaly
Fistula
Aorta
Skeletal Muscle
Diaphragm
Myosin Heavy Chains
Heart Failure
Muscles
Microcirculation
Atrophy
Extremities
Anesthesia
Oxygen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Capillarization in skeletal muscle of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. / Degens, Hans; Anderson, Rebecca K.; Alway, Stephen.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.01.2002, p. 258-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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