Carcinoma of the lower lip

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article discusses cancer of the lip and, specifically, epidermoid carcinoma of the lower lip. Malignancies of the upper lip are almost always basal cell carcinoma, although epidermoid carcinoma can occur as well (and tumors of the labial minor salivary glands). In behavior and occurrence, epidermoid carcinoma of the lip lies somewhere between oropharyngeal and skin cancer of squamous cell histology. Mortality figures for the carcinoma of the lip have steadily decreased over the past 30 to 40 years, and at present the overall survivial rate is 85 to 90 per cent. In contrast to oropharyngeal cancer, regional spread evident either at the time of initial presentation or as a delayed recurrence is distinctly uncommon in lip cancer. So, although frequent in occurrence and readily cured, carcinoma of the lip has certain diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls that should be avoided. This article describes approaches to resection, management of the regional nodes, and formulation of a reconstructive plan.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-11
Number of pages9
JournalSurgical Clinics of North America
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Lip
Carcinoma
Lip Neoplasms
Oropharyngeal Neoplasms
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Minor Salivary Glands
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Skin Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Histology
Epithelial Cells
Recurrence
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Carcinoma of the lower lip. / Luce, Edward.

In: Surgical Clinics of North America, Vol. 66, No. 1, 01.01.1986, p. 3-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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