Cardiac rehabilitation improves cardiometabolic health

In young patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

Samuel G. Wittekind, Yvette Gerdes, Wayne Mays, Clifford Chin, John Jefferies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy is deadly and costly, and treatment options are limited. Cardiac rehabilitation has proved safe and beneficial for adults with various types of heart failure. Therefore, we retrospectively evaluated the hypothesis that rehabilitation is safe and improves cardiometabolic health in young patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomypathy. From 2011 through 2015, 8 patients (4 males) (mean age, 20.6 ± 6.6 yr; range, 10–31 yr) underwent rehabilitation at our institution. They were in American Heart Association class C or D heart failure and were on maximal medical therapy. Their mean left ventricular ejection fraction at baseline was 0.26 ± 0.15. Two patients had a left ventricular assist device, and 2 were inpatients. To evaluate safety, we documented adverse events during rehabilitation sessions. Clinical endpoints were measured at baseline, immediately after completing rehabilitation, and after one year. Patients attended 120 of 141 possible sessions (85%), with no adverse events. There were no marked changes in mean left ventricular ejection fraction or body mass index. The patients’ mean waist circumference decreased by 1.37 ± 0.6 in (n=5; 95% CI, –2.1 to –0.63). Their 6-minute walk distance increased by a mean of 111 ± 75 m (n=5; 95% CI, 18–205). In our small sample of young patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac rehabilitation was feasible and was associated with minimal risk. Our findings suggest that prospective studies in this population are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-30
Number of pages4
JournalTexas Heart Institute Journal
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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Dilated Cardiomyopathy
Health
Rehabilitation
Stroke Volume
Heart Failure
Heart-Assist Devices
Waist Circumference
Cardiac Rehabilitation
Inpatients
Body Mass Index
Prospective Studies
Safety
Therapeutics
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Cardiac rehabilitation improves cardiometabolic health : In young patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. / Wittekind, Samuel G.; Gerdes, Yvette; Mays, Wayne; Chin, Clifford; Jefferies, John.

In: Texas Heart Institute Journal, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 27-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wittekind, Samuel G. ; Gerdes, Yvette ; Mays, Wayne ; Chin, Clifford ; Jefferies, John. / Cardiac rehabilitation improves cardiometabolic health : In young patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. In: Texas Heart Institute Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 45, No. 1. pp. 27-30.
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