Cardioselective beta-blocker treatment of hypertension in patients with asthma: When do benefits outweigh risks?

Timothy Self, Jessica L. Wallace, Judith E. Soberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Benefits outweigh risks of cardioselective beta-blocker therapy in patients with nonsevere asthma and a history of heart failure or myocardial infarction (MI). This review summarizes the risks versus benefits of using cardioselective beta-blockers in the treatment of hypertension in patients with asthma. Methods. We searched the English literature from 1976 to 2011 via PubMed, EMBASE, and SCOPUS using the following search terms: "beta-blocker treatment of hypertension" AND "asthma"; "cardioselective beta-blockers" AND "asthma." When pertinent articles were found, we assessed relevant articles cited in those papers. All studies related to cardioselective beta-blocker use in patients with asthma and hypertension were included. Results. Seven studies with patient populations ranging from 10 to 17 patients evaluated cardioselective beta-blockers in patients with asthma and hypertension. Atenolol and/or immediate-release metoprolol were evaluated in these studies. The duration of beta-blocker therapy in four studies was 18 weeks; two studies were single dose and one investigation lasted 8 months. Metoprolol and atenolol were generally well tolerated except at higher doses such as metoprolol >100 mg daily. Conclusion. In the absence of concomitant cardiovascular disease, routine use of beta-blockers for the treatment of hypertension in patients with asthma should be avoided

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)947-951
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume49
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

Fingerprint

Asthma
Hypertension
Metoprolol
Atenolol
Therapeutics
Literature
PubMed
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Failure
Myocardial Infarction
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Cardioselective beta-blocker treatment of hypertension in patients with asthma : When do benefits outweigh risks? / Self, Timothy; Wallace, Jessica L.; Soberman, Judith E.

In: Journal of Asthma, Vol. 49, No. 9, 01.11.2012, p. 947-951.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Self, Timothy ; Wallace, Jessica L. ; Soberman, Judith E. / Cardioselective beta-blocker treatment of hypertension in patients with asthma : When do benefits outweigh risks?. In: Journal of Asthma. 2012 ; Vol. 49, No. 9. pp. 947-951.
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