Cardiotropic viruses in the myocardium of children with end-stage heart disease

Paola Francalanci, Jamie L. Chance, Matteo Vatta, Shinawe Jimenez, Hua Li, Jeffrey Towbin, Neil E. Bowles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Transplantation has become a lifesaving procedure for children with end-stage heart failure. The long-term outcome for children who undergo transplantation has been of considerable interest, but the causes of graft failure and death are largely unknown, and the role of pre-transplant viral infection is unclear. Methods Myocardial samples from 80 explanted hearts from children with end-stage heart disease caused by congenital heart disease (CHD), cardiomyopathy, or chronic rejection were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for cardiotropic viruses using virus-specific primers. We used immunohistochemical analysis of cytoskeletal proteins to evaluate myocyte architecture. Results We identified parvoviral genomes in 6 patients (3 with CHD and 3 with cardiomyopathy). We detected no other viruses. Immunohistochemistry showed normal staining for key components of the cytoskeleton/sarcolemma, sarcomere, and nuclear membrane in the 6 virus-positive samples. The clinical outcome of these children was worse (4 long-term survivors, but 2 deaths) than for individuals without the genome. Conclusions Detecting viruses within the myocardium at the point of end-stage heart failure is not common, regardless of the primary pathology. However, the presence of viruses may result in poor outcome for the patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1046-1052
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Heart Diseases
Myocardium
Viruses
Cardiomyopathies
Heart Failure
Transplantation
Genome
Transplants
Sarcolemma
Sarcomeres
Cytoskeletal Proteins
Nuclear Envelope
Virus Diseases
Cytoskeleton
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Muscle Cells
Survivors
Immunohistochemistry
Pathology
Staining and Labeling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Cardiotropic viruses in the myocardium of children with end-stage heart disease. / Francalanci, Paola; Chance, Jamie L.; Vatta, Matteo; Jimenez, Shinawe; Li, Hua; Towbin, Jeffrey; Bowles, Neil E.

In: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, Vol. 23, No. 9, 01.09.2004, p. 1046-1052.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Francalanci, Paola ; Chance, Jamie L. ; Vatta, Matteo ; Jimenez, Shinawe ; Li, Hua ; Towbin, Jeffrey ; Bowles, Neil E. / Cardiotropic viruses in the myocardium of children with end-stage heart disease. In: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2004 ; Vol. 23, No. 9. pp. 1046-1052.
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AU - Towbin, Jeffrey

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N2 - Background Transplantation has become a lifesaving procedure for children with end-stage heart failure. The long-term outcome for children who undergo transplantation has been of considerable interest, but the causes of graft failure and death are largely unknown, and the role of pre-transplant viral infection is unclear. Methods Myocardial samples from 80 explanted hearts from children with end-stage heart disease caused by congenital heart disease (CHD), cardiomyopathy, or chronic rejection were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for cardiotropic viruses using virus-specific primers. We used immunohistochemical analysis of cytoskeletal proteins to evaluate myocyte architecture. Results We identified parvoviral genomes in 6 patients (3 with CHD and 3 with cardiomyopathy). We detected no other viruses. Immunohistochemistry showed normal staining for key components of the cytoskeleton/sarcolemma, sarcomere, and nuclear membrane in the 6 virus-positive samples. The clinical outcome of these children was worse (4 long-term survivors, but 2 deaths) than for individuals without the genome. Conclusions Detecting viruses within the myocardium at the point of end-stage heart failure is not common, regardless of the primary pathology. However, the presence of viruses may result in poor outcome for the patient.

AB - Background Transplantation has become a lifesaving procedure for children with end-stage heart failure. The long-term outcome for children who undergo transplantation has been of considerable interest, but the causes of graft failure and death are largely unknown, and the role of pre-transplant viral infection is unclear. Methods Myocardial samples from 80 explanted hearts from children with end-stage heart disease caused by congenital heart disease (CHD), cardiomyopathy, or chronic rejection were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for cardiotropic viruses using virus-specific primers. We used immunohistochemical analysis of cytoskeletal proteins to evaluate myocyte architecture. Results We identified parvoviral genomes in 6 patients (3 with CHD and 3 with cardiomyopathy). We detected no other viruses. Immunohistochemistry showed normal staining for key components of the cytoskeleton/sarcolemma, sarcomere, and nuclear membrane in the 6 virus-positive samples. The clinical outcome of these children was worse (4 long-term survivors, but 2 deaths) than for individuals without the genome. Conclusions Detecting viruses within the myocardium at the point of end-stage heart failure is not common, regardless of the primary pathology. However, the presence of viruses may result in poor outcome for the patient.

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