Cardiovascular autonomic function in healthy adolescents

Melissa Spezia Faulkner, Donna Hathaway, Elizabeth Tolley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine effects of age, sex, race, body mass index, and Tanner's stage on short-term evoked cardiovascular autonomic tests (ie, Valsalva ratio and change in heart rate with deep breathing) and 24-hour heart rate variability (HRV) in a sample of healthy adolescents, as well as to identify normative indices of both short-term evoked and 24-hour HRV in this age group. DESIGN: A descriptive, correlational design was used. SETTING: Study took place in a university hospital in a health science center located in the mid-South. SUBJECTS: Participants included 75 healthy adolescents: mean age was 15.0 ± 1.6 years, 14 were African American, 61 were white, 49 were girls, and 26 were boys. OUTCOME MEASURES: Study measures included the Valsalva ratio, change in heart rate with deep breathing, and 24-hour HRV with power spectral analysis with Holter monitoring. RESULTS: Major significant findings included lower values of 24-hour HRV measures for girls and African American adolescents (P <.05). Indices for normal ranges of both the short-term evoked and 24-hour HRV measures were computed with 95% confidence intervals. CONCLUSIONS: Few published studies address cardiac autonomic function, including 24-hour HRV, in adolescents. Most studies reporting actual normative control values of HRV for youth typically have not addressed sex or racial differences. Our study included the largest number of adolescents to date in the reported literature and demonstrated the importance of considering sex and race variation in interpreting test results. The availability of state-of-the-art technology for obtaining HRV data allows for the early identification of subclinical cardiac autonomic changes in youth who have predispositions for cardiac complications, such as those with diabetes, congential heart disease, or obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10-22
Number of pages13
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Heart Rate
African Americans
Respiration
Ambulatory Electrocardiography
Heart Diseases
Reference Values
Body Mass Index
Age Groups
Obesity
Confidence Intervals
Technology
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Cardiovascular autonomic function in healthy adolescents. / Faulkner, Melissa Spezia; Hathaway, Donna; Tolley, Elizabeth.

In: Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 10-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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