Caring for patients with allergic rhinitis

Mary Lou Hayden, Catherine Womack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Allergic rhinitis (AR) affects up to 40 million Americans, with an estimated cost of $2.7 billion per annum. This review discusses several therapeutic options that reduce the symptoms of AR, including allergen avoidance, antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids (INS), leukotriene receptor antagonists, and immunotherapy. Data sources: The articles included in this review were retrieved by a search of Medline literature on the subjects of AR, antihistamines, INS, leukotriene antagonists, and immunotherapy, as well as current published guidelines for the treatment of AR. Conclusions: Allergen avoidance is recommended for all patients prior to pharmacologic therapy. Oral and nasal H1-antihistamines are recommended to alleviate the mild and intermittent symptoms of AR, and INS are recommended as the first-line treatment choice for mild persistent and more moderate-to-severe persistent AR. Implications for practice: There are a number of different types of therapy for the management of AR; with so many options available, successful tailoring of treatment to suit individual requirements is realistically achievable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)290-298
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007

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Histamine Antagonists
Leukotriene Antagonists
Immunotherapy
Allergens
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Therapeutics
Steroid Receptors
Information Storage and Retrieval
Allergic Rhinitis
Nose
Guidelines
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Caring for patients with allergic rhinitis. / Hayden, Mary Lou; Womack, Catherine.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, Vol. 19, No. 6, 01.06.2007, p. 290-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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