Catheter tip granuloma associated with sacral region intrathecal drug administration

Julius Fernandez, Lattimore Michael, Claudio A. Feler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spinal cord compression from catheter tip granulomatous masses following intrathecal drug administration may produce devastating permanent neurologic deficits. Some authors have advocated intrathecal catheter placement below the conus medullaris to avoid the possibility of spinal cord involvement. Multiple cases of catheter tip granulomas in the thoracolumbar region have been reported. We present a unique case of a sacral region catheter tip inflammatory mass producing permanent neurologic deficits. A 71-year-old white male with a diagnosis of failed back surgery syndrome was referred to the senior author for evaluation. After more extensive conservative therapy, including spinal cord stimulation, failed to yield adequate pain relief, he was offered implantation of an intrathecal pump for opioid administration. Excellent pain relief was achieved in the postoperative period; however, three years after implantation, he presented with progressive saddle anesthesia and bowel/bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a space occupying lesion associated with the catheter tip. The patient underwent emergent second level complete sacral laminectomy with partial resection of an intradural extra-axial mass and removal of intrathecal catheter. At discharge, the patient had no restoration of neurologic function. Histologic examination of the mass confirmed a sterile inflammatory mass. It has been suggested that intrathecal catheters be placed below the conus medullaris to avoid the possibility of spinal cord involvement. We present an unusual case documenting devastating permanent neurologic deficits from a catheter tip granuloma in the sacral region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-228
Number of pages4
JournalNeuromodulation
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Fingerprint

Sacrococcygeal Region
Granuloma
Catheters
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Spinal Cord
Neurologic Manifestations
Failed Back Surgery Syndrome
Spinal Cord Stimulation
Pain
Spinal Cord Compression
Laminectomy
Postoperative Period
Opioid Analgesics
Nervous System
Urinary Bladder
Anesthesia
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Catheter tip granuloma associated with sacral region intrathecal drug administration. / Fernandez, Julius; Michael, Lattimore; Feler, Claudio A.

In: Neuromodulation, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.01.2003, p. 225-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fernandez, Julius ; Michael, Lattimore ; Feler, Claudio A. / Catheter tip granuloma associated with sacral region intrathecal drug administration. In: Neuromodulation. 2003 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 225-228.
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