Cell biology of myocardial remodeling

Contribution of nonmyocyte cells

Karl Weber, C. G. Brilla, J. S. Janicki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The myocardium is composed of cardiac myocytes and nonmyocyte cells. Nonmyocyte cells, such as fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells, represent two-thirds of the total cell population of the myocardium. The growth of these nonmyocyte cells, manifest as an accumulation of collagen in the case of fibroblasts, or as medial thickening of intramyocardial coronary arteries with vascular smooth cell growth, can contribute to the remodeling of the myocardium in various disease states and can determine whether the hypertrophic process is adaptive or pathologic. Nonmyocyte cell growth is not dependent on myocardial workload, but rather on various hormonal substances, such as angiotensin II and aldosterone. As a result, in systemic hypertension an adverse remodeling of the overloaded, hypertrophied left ventricle and the nonoverloaded, nonhypertrophied right ventricle will occur. This report reviews available information surrounding this viewpoint and suggests that, in certain models of experimental and genetic hypertension, it is the remodeling of the extracellular space and its nonmyocyte cells that leads to myocardial failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-49
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Vascular Medicine and Biology
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Cell Biology
Myocardium
Heart Ventricles
Growth
Fibroblasts
Hypertension
Genetic Models
Extracellular Space
Workload
Aldosterone
Vascular Smooth Muscle
Cardiac Myocytes
Angiotensin II
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Blood Vessels
Coronary Vessels
Theoretical Models
Collagen
Endothelial Cells
Heart Failure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Cell biology of myocardial remodeling : Contribution of nonmyocyte cells. / Weber, Karl; Brilla, C. G.; Janicki, J. S.

In: Journal of Vascular Medicine and Biology, Vol. 3, No. 1, 1991, p. 44-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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