Cells resistant to interferon are defective in activation of a promoter-binding factor.

D. S. Kessler, R. Pine, Lawrence Pfeffer, D. E. Levy, J. E. Darnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Human cultured cell lines deficient in their ability to respond to type I interferon (IFN) fail to interrupt cellular proliferation or to induce an antiviral state following exposure to IFN alpha. Comparison of non-responsive Daudi and HeLa cell lines with IFN-responsive partner cell lines and examination of non-responsive Raji cells showed that the defective cell lines expressed type I IFN receptors of typical number and affinity and bound IFN equivalently compared to the normal cells. However, transcriptional induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) was greatly reduced and delayed in these cell lines, leading to reduced accumulation of ISG mRNA. Furthermore, the rapid activation of IFN-stimulated promoter binding factors whose appearance correlates with ISG transcriptional induction, did not occur in non-responsive cells. Thus, the primary defect of these cells leading to an impaired physiological response to IFN appears to be an inability to activate promoter-binding factors necessary to trigger ISG transcription, an obligate early step in antiviral and antiproliferative physiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3779-3783
Number of pages5
JournalThe EMBO journal
Volume7
Issue number12
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Interferons
Chemical activation
Cells
Cell Line
Genes
Antiviral Agents
Interferon alpha-beta Receptor
Genetic Transcription
Interferon Type I
Physiology
Transcription
HeLa Cells
Interferon-alpha
Cultured Cells
Cell Proliferation
Messenger RNA
Defects

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Kessler, D. S., Pine, R., Pfeffer, L., Levy, D. E., & Darnell, J. E. (1988). Cells resistant to interferon are defective in activation of a promoter-binding factor. The EMBO journal, 7(12), 3779-3783.

Cells resistant to interferon are defective in activation of a promoter-binding factor. / Kessler, D. S.; Pine, R.; Pfeffer, Lawrence; Levy, D. E.; Darnell, J. E.

In: The EMBO journal, Vol. 7, No. 12, 01.01.1988, p. 3779-3783.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kessler, DS, Pine, R, Pfeffer, L, Levy, DE & Darnell, JE 1988, 'Cells resistant to interferon are defective in activation of a promoter-binding factor.', The EMBO journal, vol. 7, no. 12, pp. 3779-3783.
Kessler, D. S. ; Pine, R. ; Pfeffer, Lawrence ; Levy, D. E. ; Darnell, J. E. / Cells resistant to interferon are defective in activation of a promoter-binding factor. In: The EMBO journal. 1988 ; Vol. 7, No. 12. pp. 3779-3783.
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