Cellular and chemical neuroscience of mammalian sleep

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extraordinary strides have been made toward understanding the complexities and regulatory mechanisms of sleep over the past two decades thanks to the help of rapidly evolving technologies. At its most basic level, mammalian sleep is a restorative process of the brain and body. Beyond its primary restorative purpose, sleep is essential for a number of vital functions. Our primary research interest is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of sleep and its cognitive functions. Here I will reflect on our own research contributions to 50 years of extraordinary advances in the neurobiology of slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. I conclude this review by suggesting some potential future directions to further our understanding of the neurobiology of sleep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-440
Number of pages10
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

Fingerprint

Neurosciences
Sleep
Neurobiology
REM Sleep
Research
Cognition
Technology
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cellular and chemical neuroscience of mammalian sleep. / Datta, Subimal.

In: Sleep Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 431-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{3e7d6a7423df41ae8fffdd07b271e0b1,
title = "Cellular and chemical neuroscience of mammalian sleep",
abstract = "Extraordinary strides have been made toward understanding the complexities and regulatory mechanisms of sleep over the past two decades thanks to the help of rapidly evolving technologies. At its most basic level, mammalian sleep is a restorative process of the brain and body. Beyond its primary restorative purpose, sleep is essential for a number of vital functions. Our primary research interest is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of sleep and its cognitive functions. Here I will reflect on our own research contributions to 50 years of extraordinary advances in the neurobiology of slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. I conclude this review by suggesting some potential future directions to further our understanding of the neurobiology of sleep.",
author = "Subimal Datta",
year = "2010",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.sleep.2010.02.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "431--440",
journal = "Sleep Medicine",
issn = "1389-9457",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cellular and chemical neuroscience of mammalian sleep

AU - Datta, Subimal

PY - 2010/5/1

Y1 - 2010/5/1

N2 - Extraordinary strides have been made toward understanding the complexities and regulatory mechanisms of sleep over the past two decades thanks to the help of rapidly evolving technologies. At its most basic level, mammalian sleep is a restorative process of the brain and body. Beyond its primary restorative purpose, sleep is essential for a number of vital functions. Our primary research interest is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of sleep and its cognitive functions. Here I will reflect on our own research contributions to 50 years of extraordinary advances in the neurobiology of slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. I conclude this review by suggesting some potential future directions to further our understanding of the neurobiology of sleep.

AB - Extraordinary strides have been made toward understanding the complexities and regulatory mechanisms of sleep over the past two decades thanks to the help of rapidly evolving technologies. At its most basic level, mammalian sleep is a restorative process of the brain and body. Beyond its primary restorative purpose, sleep is essential for a number of vital functions. Our primary research interest is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of sleep and its cognitive functions. Here I will reflect on our own research contributions to 50 years of extraordinary advances in the neurobiology of slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. I conclude this review by suggesting some potential future directions to further our understanding of the neurobiology of sleep.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951627043&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77951627043&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.sleep.2010.02.002

DO - 10.1016/j.sleep.2010.02.002

M3 - Review article

VL - 11

SP - 431

EP - 440

JO - Sleep Medicine

JF - Sleep Medicine

SN - 1389-9457

IS - 5

ER -