Central Nervous System Control of Oxytocin Secretion during Lactation

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the first neuropeptides characterized, the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial hormone oxytocin is essential for milk ejection from the mammary gland during lactation. In response to suckling, oxytocin release is pulsatile, maximizing its ability to contract the myoepithelium, and forming the classic milk ejection reflex. Neurophysiological investigations reveal that this periodicity is underlain by the brief, synchronous bursts of oxytocin neurons in the supraoptic and paraventricular nucleus. This activity is prominent during lactation, is dependent upon the sensory stimulation of the young, is regulated by the somatodendritic release of oxytocin within these two nuclei, and is further dependent upon the neurotransmitters glutamate and noradrenaline. Extensive bilateral, intrahypothalamic communication is essential for full expression of the reflex. There is remarkable neuroplasticity at many levels of this system that begins in late pregnancy and extends during lactation to shape the system for maximal periodic release. This chapter explores the neuronal pathways essential to carry and modulate the reflex, and the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying oxytocin neuronal activation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationKnobil and Neill's Physiology of Reproduction
Subtitle of host publicationTwo-Volume Set
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages527-563
Number of pages37
Volume1
ISBN (Electronic)9780123977694
ISBN (Print)9780123971753
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Oxytocin
Lactation
Central Nervous System
Milk Ejection
Reflex
Posterior Pituitary Hormones
Supraoptic Nucleus
Neuronal Plasticity
Aptitude
Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus
Periodicity
Human Mammary Glands
Neuropeptides
Neurotransmitter Agents
Glutamic Acid
Norepinephrine
Communication
Neurons
Pregnancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Armstrong, W. (2015). Central Nervous System Control of Oxytocin Secretion during Lactation. In Knobil and Neill's Physiology of Reproduction: Two-Volume Set (Vol. 1, pp. 527-563). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-397175-3.00013-2

Central Nervous System Control of Oxytocin Secretion during Lactation. / Armstrong, William.

Knobil and Neill's Physiology of Reproduction: Two-Volume Set. Vol. 1 Elsevier Inc., 2015. p. 527-563.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Armstrong, W 2015, Central Nervous System Control of Oxytocin Secretion during Lactation. in Knobil and Neill's Physiology of Reproduction: Two-Volume Set. vol. 1, Elsevier Inc., pp. 527-563. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-397175-3.00013-2
Armstrong W. Central Nervous System Control of Oxytocin Secretion during Lactation. In Knobil and Neill's Physiology of Reproduction: Two-Volume Set. Vol. 1. Elsevier Inc. 2015. p. 527-563 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-397175-3.00013-2
Armstrong, William. / Central Nervous System Control of Oxytocin Secretion during Lactation. Knobil and Neill's Physiology of Reproduction: Two-Volume Set. Vol. 1 Elsevier Inc., 2015. pp. 527-563
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