Ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite as a bone graft material: a brief review

S. R. Dutta, D. Passi, Purnima Singh, A. Bhuibhar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Treatment of dental, craniofacial and orthopedic defects with bone graft substitutes has shown promising result achieving almost complete bone regeneration depending on product resorption similar to human bone’s physicochemical and crystallographic characteristics. Among these, non-ceramic and ceramic hydroxyapatite being the main inorganic salt of bone is the most studied calcium phosphate material in clinical practices ever since 1970s and non-ceramic since 1985. Its “chemical similarity” with the mineralized phase of biologic bone makes it unique. Hydroxyapatite as an excellent carrier of osteoinductive growth factors and osteogenic cell populations is also useful as drug delivery vehicle regardless of its density. Porous ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite is osteoconductive, biocompatible and very inert. The need for bone graft material keeps on increasing with increased age of the population and the increased conditions of trauma. Recent advances in genetic engineering and doping techniques have made it possible to use non-ceramic hydroxyapatite in larger non-ceramic crystals and cluster forms as a successful bone graft substitute to treat various types of bone defects. In this paper we have mentioned some recently studied properties of hydroxyapatite and its various uses through a brief review of the literatures available to date.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-106
Number of pages6
JournalIrish Journal of Medical Science
Volume184
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Ceramics
Durapatite
Transplants
Bone and Bones
Bone Substitutes
Bone Regeneration
Genetic Engineering
Population
Orthopedics
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Tooth
Salts
Wounds and Injuries
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite as a bone graft material : a brief review. / Dutta, S. R.; Passi, D.; Singh, Purnima; Bhuibhar, A.

In: Irish Journal of Medical Science, Vol. 184, No. 1, 01.03.2015, p. 101-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Dutta, S. R. ; Passi, D. ; Singh, Purnima ; Bhuibhar, A. / Ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite as a bone graft material : a brief review. In: Irish Journal of Medical Science. 2015 ; Vol. 184, No. 1. pp. 101-106.
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