Cerebral blood flow physiology and metabolism

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The brain comprises only 2% of total body weight; however, under normal conditions, it receives 15–20% of the cardiac output and accounts for 20% of total body oxygen consumption. Because energy reserves within the brain are negligible, adequate blood flow is essential for the provision of a continuous supply of energy-producing substrates and for the removal of the byproducts of cellular metabolism. NORMAL PHYSIOLOGY OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is normally approximately 50 mL/100 g per minute. Regionally it is greater for gray matter than for white matter, 70 mL/100 g per minute versus 20 mL/100 g per minute, respectively. This rate is slightly increased in youth, and decreases with age. ▪ CBF less than 30 mL/100 g per minute can pro- duce neurologic symptoms. ▪ CBF between 15 and 20 mL/100 g per minute will cause reversible damage or “electrical failure” ▪ CBF rates of 10-15 mL/100 g per minute cause irreversible neuronal damage.CBF is determined by blood viscosity, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and vessel radius. This relationship is expressed with the Hagen–Poiselle formula: where P is CPP, r is the cumulative radii of cerebral regulatory resistance vessels, n is whole blood viscosity, L is cerebral vessel length, and Q is CBF. Vessel length is not a physiologic variable that changes or can be manipulated. The brain has no significant storage capacity, so metabolism and CBF are tightly coupled, and this is called metabolic-flow coupling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNeurocritical Care
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages1-10
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9780511635434
ISBN (Print)9780521676892
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
Blood Physiological Phenomena
Blood Viscosity
Cognitive Reserve
Brain
Neurologic Manifestations
Oxygen Consumption
Cardiac Output

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Malkoff, M. (2009). Cerebral blood flow physiology and metabolism. In Neurocritical Care (pp. 1-10). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511635434.003

Cerebral blood flow physiology and metabolism. / Malkoff, Marc.

Neurocritical Care. Cambridge University Press, 2009. p. 1-10.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Malkoff, M 2009, Cerebral blood flow physiology and metabolism. in Neurocritical Care. Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511635434.003
Malkoff M. Cerebral blood flow physiology and metabolism. In Neurocritical Care. Cambridge University Press. 2009. p. 1-10 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511635434.003
Malkoff, Marc. / Cerebral blood flow physiology and metabolism. Neurocritical Care. Cambridge University Press, 2009. pp. 1-10
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