Cerebral vascular volume after repeated ischemic insults in the gerbil

Comparison with changes in CBF and brain edema

R. Pluta, S. Tomida, J. Ikeda, Thaddeus Nowak, I. Klatzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The time course of changes in cerebral intravascular volume was evaluated during 24 h following a series of three 5-min carotid artery occlusions spaced at 1-h intervals and compared with the changes occurring after single 5- or 15-min occlusions. Quantitative estimates of cerebral red cell volume, plasma volume and total blood volume were obtained from the distribution spaces of 51Cr-labeled erythrocytes and 125I-albumin infused prior to killing at varied recirculation intervals. Significant reductions in vascular volume occurred in all ischemic brain regions within 1 h following a single 5-min occlusion, which recovered to control values within 6 h. A similar time course was seen after repeated occlusions. The reductions in volume remained significant at 6 h after a single 15-min occlusion, but there was no difference from control by 24 h. Thus, the time course of total vascular volume correlates well with that of CBF changes previously described, and both blood flow and blood volume are at normal levels during the time of severe edema 24 h after repeated occlusions. Calculated cerebral hematocrit was 60-70% of that obtained from the femoral artery, but was identical in all brain regions and was constant throughout the postischemic recirculation period, with the exception of a transient reduction in both peripheral and cerebral hematocrit observed at 6-h recirculation following single 15-min occlusions. These results suggest that changes in CBF and blood volume reflect primarily the status of larger vessels and that values in the normal range may be observed even under conditions of severe edema and impaired perfusion at the capillary level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-170
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gerbillinae
Brain Edema
Blood Vessels
Blood Volume
Hematocrit
Edema
Plasma Volume
Brain
Femoral Artery
Cell Size
Carotid Arteries
Albumins
Reference Values
Perfusion
Erythrocytes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Cerebral vascular volume after repeated ischemic insults in the gerbil : Comparison with changes in CBF and brain edema. / Pluta, R.; Tomida, S.; Ikeda, J.; Nowak, Thaddeus; Klatzo, I.

In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.01.1989, p. 163-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{530578f0e7554751aebf5c946ff8cfb9,
title = "Cerebral vascular volume after repeated ischemic insults in the gerbil: Comparison with changes in CBF and brain edema",
abstract = "The time course of changes in cerebral intravascular volume was evaluated during 24 h following a series of three 5-min carotid artery occlusions spaced at 1-h intervals and compared with the changes occurring after single 5- or 15-min occlusions. Quantitative estimates of cerebral red cell volume, plasma volume and total blood volume were obtained from the distribution spaces of 51Cr-labeled erythrocytes and 125I-albumin infused prior to killing at varied recirculation intervals. Significant reductions in vascular volume occurred in all ischemic brain regions within 1 h following a single 5-min occlusion, which recovered to control values within 6 h. A similar time course was seen after repeated occlusions. The reductions in volume remained significant at 6 h after a single 15-min occlusion, but there was no difference from control by 24 h. Thus, the time course of total vascular volume correlates well with that of CBF changes previously described, and both blood flow and blood volume are at normal levels during the time of severe edema 24 h after repeated occlusions. Calculated cerebral hematocrit was 60-70{\%} of that obtained from the femoral artery, but was identical in all brain regions and was constant throughout the postischemic recirculation period, with the exception of a transient reduction in both peripheral and cerebral hematocrit observed at 6-h recirculation following single 15-min occlusions. These results suggest that changes in CBF and blood volume reflect primarily the status of larger vessels and that values in the normal range may be observed even under conditions of severe edema and impaired perfusion at the capillary level.",
author = "R. Pluta and S. Tomida and J. Ikeda and Thaddeus Nowak and I. Klatzo",
year = "1989",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/jcbfm.1989.24",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "163--170",
journal = "Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism",
issn = "0271-678X",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cerebral vascular volume after repeated ischemic insults in the gerbil

T2 - Comparison with changes in CBF and brain edema

AU - Pluta, R.

AU - Tomida, S.

AU - Ikeda, J.

AU - Nowak, Thaddeus

AU - Klatzo, I.

PY - 1989/1/1

Y1 - 1989/1/1

N2 - The time course of changes in cerebral intravascular volume was evaluated during 24 h following a series of three 5-min carotid artery occlusions spaced at 1-h intervals and compared with the changes occurring after single 5- or 15-min occlusions. Quantitative estimates of cerebral red cell volume, plasma volume and total blood volume were obtained from the distribution spaces of 51Cr-labeled erythrocytes and 125I-albumin infused prior to killing at varied recirculation intervals. Significant reductions in vascular volume occurred in all ischemic brain regions within 1 h following a single 5-min occlusion, which recovered to control values within 6 h. A similar time course was seen after repeated occlusions. The reductions in volume remained significant at 6 h after a single 15-min occlusion, but there was no difference from control by 24 h. Thus, the time course of total vascular volume correlates well with that of CBF changes previously described, and both blood flow and blood volume are at normal levels during the time of severe edema 24 h after repeated occlusions. Calculated cerebral hematocrit was 60-70% of that obtained from the femoral artery, but was identical in all brain regions and was constant throughout the postischemic recirculation period, with the exception of a transient reduction in both peripheral and cerebral hematocrit observed at 6-h recirculation following single 15-min occlusions. These results suggest that changes in CBF and blood volume reflect primarily the status of larger vessels and that values in the normal range may be observed even under conditions of severe edema and impaired perfusion at the capillary level.

AB - The time course of changes in cerebral intravascular volume was evaluated during 24 h following a series of three 5-min carotid artery occlusions spaced at 1-h intervals and compared with the changes occurring after single 5- or 15-min occlusions. Quantitative estimates of cerebral red cell volume, plasma volume and total blood volume were obtained from the distribution spaces of 51Cr-labeled erythrocytes and 125I-albumin infused prior to killing at varied recirculation intervals. Significant reductions in vascular volume occurred in all ischemic brain regions within 1 h following a single 5-min occlusion, which recovered to control values within 6 h. A similar time course was seen after repeated occlusions. The reductions in volume remained significant at 6 h after a single 15-min occlusion, but there was no difference from control by 24 h. Thus, the time course of total vascular volume correlates well with that of CBF changes previously described, and both blood flow and blood volume are at normal levels during the time of severe edema 24 h after repeated occlusions. Calculated cerebral hematocrit was 60-70% of that obtained from the femoral artery, but was identical in all brain regions and was constant throughout the postischemic recirculation period, with the exception of a transient reduction in both peripheral and cerebral hematocrit observed at 6-h recirculation following single 15-min occlusions. These results suggest that changes in CBF and blood volume reflect primarily the status of larger vessels and that values in the normal range may be observed even under conditions of severe edema and impaired perfusion at the capillary level.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024498744&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024498744&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/jcbfm.1989.24

DO - 10.1038/jcbfm.1989.24

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 163

EP - 170

JO - Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

SN - 0271-678X

IS - 2

ER -