Cervical Spine Trauma in the Pediatric Patient

Paul Klimo, Marcus L. Ware, Nalin Gupta, Douglas Brockmeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Injuries to the pediatric cervical spine occur infrequently. Numerous unique anatomic and biomechanical features of the pediatric spine render it much more flexible than the adult spine. These features give rise to significant differences in the presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of pediatric cervical trauma compared with adults. Younger children more often suffer injury to the upper cervical spine with greater neurologic injury and fewer fractures. Once the child reaches the age of 10 years, he or she develops a more adult-type spine, and injuries are thus more similar to those seen in the adult population. The unique anatomic and biomechanical differences in the pediatric spine are discussed, along with the various common and unique injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-620
Number of pages22
JournalNeurosurgery Clinics of North America
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spine
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Nervous System Trauma
Population
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Cervical Spine Trauma in the Pediatric Patient. / Klimo, Paul; Ware, Marcus L.; Gupta, Nalin; Brockmeyer, Douglas.

In: Neurosurgery Clinics of North America, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01.10.2007, p. 599-620.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Klimo, Paul ; Ware, Marcus L. ; Gupta, Nalin ; Brockmeyer, Douglas. / Cervical Spine Trauma in the Pediatric Patient. In: Neurosurgery Clinics of North America. 2007 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 599-620.
@article{c04f67f55bdf4d6b9b6fdbaf15a49e64,
title = "Cervical Spine Trauma in the Pediatric Patient",
abstract = "Injuries to the pediatric cervical spine occur infrequently. Numerous unique anatomic and biomechanical features of the pediatric spine render it much more flexible than the adult spine. These features give rise to significant differences in the presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of pediatric cervical trauma compared with adults. Younger children more often suffer injury to the upper cervical spine with greater neurologic injury and fewer fractures. Once the child reaches the age of 10 years, he or she develops a more adult-type spine, and injuries are thus more similar to those seen in the adult population. The unique anatomic and biomechanical differences in the pediatric spine are discussed, along with the various common and unique injuries.",
author = "Paul Klimo and Ware, {Marcus L.} and Nalin Gupta and Douglas Brockmeyer",
year = "2007",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.nec.2007.09.004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "599--620",
journal = "Neurosurgery Clinics of North America",
issn = "1042-3680",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cervical Spine Trauma in the Pediatric Patient

AU - Klimo, Paul

AU - Ware, Marcus L.

AU - Gupta, Nalin

AU - Brockmeyer, Douglas

PY - 2007/10/1

Y1 - 2007/10/1

N2 - Injuries to the pediatric cervical spine occur infrequently. Numerous unique anatomic and biomechanical features of the pediatric spine render it much more flexible than the adult spine. These features give rise to significant differences in the presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of pediatric cervical trauma compared with adults. Younger children more often suffer injury to the upper cervical spine with greater neurologic injury and fewer fractures. Once the child reaches the age of 10 years, he or she develops a more adult-type spine, and injuries are thus more similar to those seen in the adult population. The unique anatomic and biomechanical differences in the pediatric spine are discussed, along with the various common and unique injuries.

AB - Injuries to the pediatric cervical spine occur infrequently. Numerous unique anatomic and biomechanical features of the pediatric spine render it much more flexible than the adult spine. These features give rise to significant differences in the presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of pediatric cervical trauma compared with adults. Younger children more often suffer injury to the upper cervical spine with greater neurologic injury and fewer fractures. Once the child reaches the age of 10 years, he or she develops a more adult-type spine, and injuries are thus more similar to those seen in the adult population. The unique anatomic and biomechanical differences in the pediatric spine are discussed, along with the various common and unique injuries.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35649002467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35649002467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.nec.2007.09.004

DO - 10.1016/j.nec.2007.09.004

M3 - Review article

VL - 18

SP - 599

EP - 620

JO - Neurosurgery Clinics of North America

JF - Neurosurgery Clinics of North America

SN - 1042-3680

IS - 4

ER -