Changes in Cardiovascular Disease knowledge and behavior in a low-education population of African-American and white adults

Nicholas L. Smith, Janet B. Croft, Gregory Heath, Vilma Cokkinides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: Racial differences in secular changes in cardiovascular disease risk factor knowledge and behaviors were assessed among adults with low levels of education throughout a community-wide cardiovascular disease prevention program. Methods: Four independent cross-sectional telephone surveys were conducted with the random-digit-dialing technique in 1987, 1988, 1989, and 1991 in a biracial South Carolina community. Community-wide cardiovascular disease intervention programs were initiated in 1988 and continued through 1990. Changes in the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factor knowledge, dietary fat intake, leisure-time physical activity, smoking, and cholesterol screening behavior were compared between African-American and white respondents in a population subset with less than 12 years of education using analysis of covariance regression techniques. Results: Mean intake of high fat foods was lower in 1991 than in 1987 among both white and African-American respondents; the trend for lower mean intake began in 1989 among African-American adults. Prevalence of the correct exercise knowledge was higher in 1988 than in 1987 for both groups, but this trend was maintained only among white respondents. However, prevalence of leisure-time physical activity did not change significantly between 1987 and 1991. Prevalence of cholesterol level knowledge and screening behavior increased over time among both groups; however, greater increasing trends between 1987 and 1991 were observed among white adults. Conclusions: Favorable secular changes in fat intake, exercise knowledge, cholesterol level knowledge, and cholesterol screening behavior were observed among both race groups during a time period that coincided with community-wide intervention efforts and messages. Greater changes in most of these behaviors and knowledge were observed among white adults suggesting that health behavior messages may not have reached all segments of this community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)244-254
Number of pages11
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume6
Issue number3-4
StatePublished - Sep 1 1996

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African Americans
Cardiovascular Diseases
Education
Cholesterol
Exercise
Population
Leisure Activities
Fats
Dietary Fats
Health Behavior
Telephone
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Food
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

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Changes in Cardiovascular Disease knowledge and behavior in a low-education population of African-American and white adults. / Smith, Nicholas L.; Croft, Janet B.; Heath, Gregory; Cokkinides, Vilma.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 6, No. 3-4, 01.09.1996, p. 244-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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