Changing patterns in the incidence and survival of thyroid cancer with follicular phenotype - Papillary, follicular, and anaplastic

A morphological and epidemiological study

Jorge Albores-Saavedra, Donald Earl Henson, Evan Glazer, Arnold M. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thyroid carcinomas with follicular phenotype have demonstrated changing patterns over 30 years (1973- 2003) according to data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of the National Cancer Institute. Papillary carcinomas have significantly increased. They accounted for 74% of all cases of thyroid cancers in 1973 and 87% in 2003. During this period, the incidence rate of papillary carcinoma (including the follicular variant) increased by 189%, the rate of follicular carcinoma remained stable, and the rate of anaplastic carcinoma decreased by 22%. The rate of the follicular variant of papillary carcinoma alone increased by 173%. Thyroid cancer was more common in whites than in blacks and in females more than in males. Papillary carcinomas rapidly increased during adolescence and reached a peak around age 52-56, then declined. Follicular carcinomas increased steadily, but at a lower rate until age 80. After 1988, both papillary and follicular carcinomas, less than 2 cm, increased at the same rate as carcinomas larger than 2 cm. However, papillary carcinomas less than 2 cm were more common. Overall, the 10-year relative survival rate was greater than 90% for blacks and whites with the exception of follicular carcinoma in blacks. The 10-year relative survival rate for anaplastic carcinoma in patients over 40 years of age was 4.7%. The decrease in incidence rate of anaplastic carcinoma may be the result of the successful treatment of papillary and follicular carcinomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalEndocrine Pathology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Epidemiologic Studies
Carcinoma, Papillary, Follicular
Carcinoma
Phenotype
Survival
Incidence
Papillary Carcinoma
Thyroid Neoplasms
Survival Rate
SEER Program
Follicular Adenocarcinoma
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Follicular Thyroid cancer

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Changing patterns in the incidence and survival of thyroid cancer with follicular phenotype - Papillary, follicular, and anaplastic : A morphological and epidemiological study. / Albores-Saavedra, Jorge; Henson, Donald Earl; Glazer, Evan; Schwartz, Arnold M.

In: Endocrine Pathology, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.03.2007, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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