Changing perceptions and practices regarding aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and cyclooxygenase-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among US primary care providers

N. Elnachef, J. M. Scheiman, A. M. Fendrick, Colin Howden, W. D. Chey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Our understanding of the benefits and risks of aspirin non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective NSAIDs and gastro-protective agents (GPAs) continues to expand. Aim: To assess the perceptions and practices of US primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding the use of aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs and GPA. Methods: A 34-question survey was administered to 1000 US PCPs via the internet. Questions addressed issues involving aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs, and GPAs. Around 491 of 1000 PCPs had participated in a similar survey conducted in 2003. Results: Eighty-five per cent of PCPs reported that >25% of their patients were taking aspirin for preventive reasons. Nineteen per cent performed a risk calculation when deciding whether to start aspirin for cardioprotection. Fifty-four per cent recommended a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) for a patient with a recently healed ulcer who required ongoing aspirin. Thirty-one per cent reported prescribing NSAIDs more often and 52% were more likely to recommend a GPA with an NSAID than in 2003. Although PCPs were less likely to recommend a COX-2 selective NSAID compared to 2003, only 41% felt that rofecoxib increased cardiovascular risk. One-third felt that celecoxib and traditional NSAIDs were associated with increased cardiac risk. Conclusion: This survey identified several areas of ongoing confusion regarding aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs and GPAs, which should help direct future educational efforts regarding the benefits, risks and appropriate use of these agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1249-1258
Number of pages10
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume28
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

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Cyclooxygenase 2
Aspirin
Primary Health Care
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Protective Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Primary Care Physicians
Celecoxib
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Internet
Ulcer

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Changing perceptions and practices regarding aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and cyclooxygenase-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among US primary care providers",
abstract = "Background: Our understanding of the benefits and risks of aspirin non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective NSAIDs and gastro-protective agents (GPAs) continues to expand. Aim: To assess the perceptions and practices of US primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding the use of aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs and GPA. Methods: A 34-question survey was administered to 1000 US PCPs via the internet. Questions addressed issues involving aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs, and GPAs. Around 491 of 1000 PCPs had participated in a similar survey conducted in 2003. Results: Eighty-five per cent of PCPs reported that >25{\%} of their patients were taking aspirin for preventive reasons. Nineteen per cent performed a risk calculation when deciding whether to start aspirin for cardioprotection. Fifty-four per cent recommended a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) for a patient with a recently healed ulcer who required ongoing aspirin. Thirty-one per cent reported prescribing NSAIDs more often and 52{\%} were more likely to recommend a GPA with an NSAID than in 2003. Although PCPs were less likely to recommend a COX-2 selective NSAID compared to 2003, only 41{\%} felt that rofecoxib increased cardiovascular risk. One-third felt that celecoxib and traditional NSAIDs were associated with increased cardiac risk. Conclusion: This survey identified several areas of ongoing confusion regarding aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs and GPAs, which should help direct future educational efforts regarding the benefits, risks and appropriate use of these agents.",
author = "N. Elnachef and Scheiman, {J. M.} and Fendrick, {A. M.} and Colin Howden and Chey, {W. D.}",
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T1 - Changing perceptions and practices regarding aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and cyclooxygenase-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among US primary care providers

AU - Elnachef, N.

AU - Scheiman, J. M.

AU - Fendrick, A. M.

AU - Howden, Colin

AU - Chey, W. D.

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N2 - Background: Our understanding of the benefits and risks of aspirin non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective NSAIDs and gastro-protective agents (GPAs) continues to expand. Aim: To assess the perceptions and practices of US primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding the use of aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs and GPA. Methods: A 34-question survey was administered to 1000 US PCPs via the internet. Questions addressed issues involving aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs, and GPAs. Around 491 of 1000 PCPs had participated in a similar survey conducted in 2003. Results: Eighty-five per cent of PCPs reported that >25% of their patients were taking aspirin for preventive reasons. Nineteen per cent performed a risk calculation when deciding whether to start aspirin for cardioprotection. Fifty-four per cent recommended a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) for a patient with a recently healed ulcer who required ongoing aspirin. Thirty-one per cent reported prescribing NSAIDs more often and 52% were more likely to recommend a GPA with an NSAID than in 2003. Although PCPs were less likely to recommend a COX-2 selective NSAID compared to 2003, only 41% felt that rofecoxib increased cardiovascular risk. One-third felt that celecoxib and traditional NSAIDs were associated with increased cardiac risk. Conclusion: This survey identified several areas of ongoing confusion regarding aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs and GPAs, which should help direct future educational efforts regarding the benefits, risks and appropriate use of these agents.

AB - Background: Our understanding of the benefits and risks of aspirin non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective NSAIDs and gastro-protective agents (GPAs) continues to expand. Aim: To assess the perceptions and practices of US primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding the use of aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs and GPA. Methods: A 34-question survey was administered to 1000 US PCPs via the internet. Questions addressed issues involving aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs, and GPAs. Around 491 of 1000 PCPs had participated in a similar survey conducted in 2003. Results: Eighty-five per cent of PCPs reported that >25% of their patients were taking aspirin for preventive reasons. Nineteen per cent performed a risk calculation when deciding whether to start aspirin for cardioprotection. Fifty-four per cent recommended a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) for a patient with a recently healed ulcer who required ongoing aspirin. Thirty-one per cent reported prescribing NSAIDs more often and 52% were more likely to recommend a GPA with an NSAID than in 2003. Although PCPs were less likely to recommend a COX-2 selective NSAID compared to 2003, only 41% felt that rofecoxib increased cardiovascular risk. One-third felt that celecoxib and traditional NSAIDs were associated with increased cardiac risk. Conclusion: This survey identified several areas of ongoing confusion regarding aspirin, NSAIDs, COX-2 selective NSAIDs and GPAs, which should help direct future educational efforts regarding the benefits, risks and appropriate use of these agents.

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