Changing trends in esophageal cancer

A 15-year experience in a single center

Virender Kumar Sharma, Hema Chockalingam, Carlton A. Hornung, Rajeev Vasudeva, Colin Howden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Esophageal adenocarcinoma is increasing in white men. We sought to identify trends in esophageal cancer in different patient groups in our region. Methods: We reviewed the records of all patients with esophageal cancer seen at two hospitals in Columbia, SC between 1981 and 1995. Patients were divided into three cohorts (1981-1985, 1986-1990, and 1991-1995). Demographic data, histological type, tumor stage, grade, and survival were recorded. Results: Histology was available in 371 of 386 patients (cohort 1, 113 patients; cohort 2, 144; and cohort 3, 114). Adenocarcinoma accounted for 24%, 27%, and 49% of esophageal cancer in white men in cohorts 1, 2, and 3, respectively (p = 0.03). Corresponding figures for African-Americans were 10%, 7%, and 3% (p = 0.22). Women comprised 8%, 14%, and 22% of patients with squamous carcinoma in the three cohorts (p = 0.03). Median survival for esophageal cancer was 6.0, 6.8, and 10.4 mo in cohorts 1, 2, and 3 (p = 0.0002). Conclusion: Adenocarcinoma is increasing in whites. Squamous carcinoma remains the predominant type in this region, seen mainly in African-Americans. Esophageal squamous carcinoma is increasing in women. The mean age at diagnosis of squamous carcinoma has decreased in whites. There is a trend toward improved survival in patients with esophageal cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)702-705
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume93
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Esophageal Neoplasms
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Adenocarcinoma
African Americans
Survival
Histology
Demography
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Changing trends in esophageal cancer : A 15-year experience in a single center. / Sharma, Virender Kumar; Chockalingam, Hema; Hornung, Carlton A.; Vasudeva, Rajeev; Howden, Colin.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 93, No. 5, 01.05.1998, p. 702-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharma, Virender Kumar ; Chockalingam, Hema ; Hornung, Carlton A. ; Vasudeva, Rajeev ; Howden, Colin. / Changing trends in esophageal cancer : A 15-year experience in a single center. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 1998 ; Vol. 93, No. 5. pp. 702-705.
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