Characterisation of freeze-dried type II collagen and chondroitin sulfate scaffolds

M. Tamaddon, R. S. Walton, D. D. Brand, J. T. Czernuszka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Collagen type-II is the dominant type of collagen in articular cartilage and chondroitin sulfate is one of the main components of cartilage extracellular matrix. Afibrillar and fibrillar type-II atelocollagen scaffolds with and without chondroitin sulfate were prepared using casting and freeze-drying methods. The scaffolds were characterised to highlight the effects of fibrillogenesis and chondroitin sulfate addition on viscosity, pore structure, porosity and mechanical properties. Microstructure analysis showed that fibrillogenesis increased the circularity of pores significantly in collagen-only scaffolds, whereas with it, no significant change was observed in chondroitin sulfate- containing scaffolds. Addition of chondroitin sulfate to afibrillar scaffolds increased the circularity of the pores and the proportion of pores between 50 and 300 lm suitable for chondrocytes growth. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy explained the bonding between chondroitin sulfate and afibrillar collagen- confirmed with rheology resultswhich increased the compressive modulus 10-fold to 0.28 kPa. No bonding was observed in other scaffolds and consequently no significant changes in compressive modulus were detected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1153-1165
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

Fingerprint

Collagen Type II
Chondroitin Sulfates
collagens
Scaffolds (biology)
Collagen
Scaffolds
sulfates
porosity
cartilage
Cartilage
freeze drying
Freeze Drying
Rheology
Porosity
Articular Cartilage
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Chondrocytes
Pore structure
rheology
Viscosity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Characterisation of freeze-dried type II collagen and chondroitin sulfate scaffolds. / Tamaddon, M.; Walton, R. S.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J. T.

In: Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 5, 01.05.2013, p. 1153-1165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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