Characterization of basal and re-inflammation-associated long-term alteration in pain responsivity following short-lasting neonatal local inflamatory insult

K. Ren, V. Anseloni, S. P. Zou, E. B. Wade, S. I. Novikova, Matthew Ennis, R. J. Traub, M. S. Gold, R. Dubner, M. S. Lidow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

164 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, several studies have suggested that neonatal noxious insult could alter future responses to painful stimuli. However, the manifestations, mechanisms, and even developmental nature of these alterations remain a matter of controversy. In part, this is due to the lack of detailed information on the neonatal sensitive period(s) during which noxious stimulation influences future nociception, and the time-course and distribution of the resultant abnormalities. The present paper describes these parameters in a rat model of short-lasting (∼24 h) neonatal local inflammation of a hindpaw produced by injection of 0.25% carrageenan (1 μl/g). Examinations of paw withdrawal responses to thermal and mechanical stimulations in adult animals, which as neonates were subjected to this insult, showed that the previously-reported long-term hypoalgesia and hyperalgesia are not mutually exclusive outcomes of early noxious experience. Long-term hypoalgesia was apparent at the basal conditions and was equally strong in the previously injured and uninjured paws, which suggests a globally-driven deficit. In contrast, long-term excessive hyperalgesia had the strongest manifestation in the neonatally-injured paw after re-inflammation, indicating significant segmental involvement in its generation. The differences between mechanisms underlying the observed hypoalgesia and hyperalgesia are further underscored by the finding that, while the former is detectable only after animals reach the second month of life, the latter is elicitable immediately upon cessation of the initial neonatal inflammation. Nevertheless, we detected a significant overlap in the neonatal sensitive periods for generation of these effects (both occurring within the first postnatal week). Also, neither the basal hypoalgesia nor excessive re-inflammation-associated hyperalgesia subsided with age and were detectable in 120-125-day-old rats. These finding provide a framework within which the entire complex of long-term effects of early noxious experience can be understood and examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)588-596
Number of pages9
JournalPain
Volume110
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004

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Hyperalgesia
Inflammation
Pain
Cohort Effect
Nociception
Carrageenan
Hot Temperature
Injections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Characterization of basal and re-inflammation-associated long-term alteration in pain responsivity following short-lasting neonatal local inflamatory insult. / Ren, K.; Anseloni, V.; Zou, S. P.; Wade, E. B.; Novikova, S. I.; Ennis, Matthew; Traub, R. J.; Gold, M. S.; Dubner, R.; Lidow, M. S.

In: Pain, Vol. 110, No. 3, 01.08.2004, p. 588-596.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ren, K. ; Anseloni, V. ; Zou, S. P. ; Wade, E. B. ; Novikova, S. I. ; Ennis, Matthew ; Traub, R. J. ; Gold, M. S. ; Dubner, R. ; Lidow, M. S. / Characterization of basal and re-inflammation-associated long-term alteration in pain responsivity following short-lasting neonatal local inflamatory insult. In: Pain. 2004 ; Vol. 110, No. 3. pp. 588-596.
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AU - Novikova, S. I.

AU - Ennis, Matthew

AU - Traub, R. J.

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