Characterization of bionanocomposite scaffolds comprised of amine-functionalized gold nanoparticles and silicon carbide nanowires crosslinked to an acellular porcine tendon

Corey R. Deeken, Derek B. Fox, Sharon L. Bachman, Bruce Ramshaw, Sheila A. Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As one of the most common proteins found in the human body, collagen is regarded as biocompatible and has many properties making it ideal for soft-tissue repair applications. However, collagen matrices fabricated from purified forms of collagen are notoriously weak and easily degraded by the body. The extracellular matrix of many tissues including human dermis, porcine dermis, and porcine small intestine submucosa are often utilized instead, and several of these scaffolds are crosslinked. Crosslinking has been shown to improve the mechanical properties of collagenous tissues and increase their resistance to degradation. In this study we investigated two novel "bionanocomposite" materials in which either gold nanoparticles or silicon carbide nanowires were crosslinked to a porcine tendon. Scanning electron micrographs confirmed that the nanomaterials were successfully crosslinked to the tissues. A collagenase assay, tensile testing, flow cytometry, and bioreactor studies were also performed to further characterize the properties of these novel materials. The results of these studies indicated that crosslinking porcine diaphragm tissues with nanomaterials resulted in scaffolds with improved resistance to enzymatic degradation and appropriate biocompatibility characteristics, thus warranting further study of these materials for soft tissue repair and tissue engineering applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)334-344
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials
Volume97 B
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tendons
Scaffolds
Silicon carbide
Gold
Nanowires
Amines
Tissue
Nanoparticles
Collagen
Nanostructured materials
Crosslinking
Repair
Degradation
Flow cytometry
Tensile testing
Collagenases
Diaphragms
Bioreactors
Biocompatibility
Tissue engineering

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials

Cite this

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AU - Ramshaw, Bruce

AU - Grant, Sheila A.

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