Characterization of heavyweight and lightweight polypropylene prosthetic mesh explants from a single patient

C. R. Costello, S. L. Bachman, S. A. Grant, D. S. Cleveland, T. S. Loy, Bruce Ramshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although polypropylene has been used as a hernia repair material for nearly 50 years, very little science has been applied to studying the body's effect on this material. It is possible that oxidation of mesh occurs as a result of the chemical structure of polypropylene and the physiological conditions to which it is subjected; this leads to embrittlement of the material, impaired abdominal movement, and chronic pain. It is also possible that lightweight polypropylene meshes undergo less oxidation due to a reduced inflammatory reaction. The objective of this study was to characterize explanted hernia meshes using techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and compliance testing to determine whether the mesh density of polypropylene affects the oxidative degradation of the material. The hypothesis was that heavyweight polypropylene would incite a more intense inflammatory response than lightweight polypropylene and thus undergo greater oxidative degradation. Overall, the results support this theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)168-176
Number of pages9
JournalSurgical Innovation
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Polypropylenes
Herniorrhaphy
Differential Scanning Calorimetry
Hernia
Chronic Pain
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Abdominal Pain
Compliance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Characterization of heavyweight and lightweight polypropylene prosthetic mesh explants from a single patient. / Costello, C. R.; Bachman, S. L.; Grant, S. A.; Cleveland, D. S.; Loy, T. S.; Ramshaw, Bruce.

In: Surgical Innovation, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.09.2007, p. 168-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Costello, C. R. ; Bachman, S. L. ; Grant, S. A. ; Cleveland, D. S. ; Loy, T. S. ; Ramshaw, Bruce. / Characterization of heavyweight and lightweight polypropylene prosthetic mesh explants from a single patient. In: Surgical Innovation. 2007 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 168-176.
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