Characterizing dietary intake and physical activity affecting weight gain in kidney transplant recipients

Connie K. Cupples, Ann K. Cashion, Patricia A. Cowan, Ruth S. Tutor, Mona Wicks, Ruth Williams, James D. Eason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context-Weight gain after kidney transplantation affects 50% to 90% of kidney transplant recipients. Factors leading to weight gain in recipients are thought to include a change in lifestyle (eg, dietary intake and physical activity), age, race, sex, and immunosuppressant medications.Objective-To examine dietary intake and physical activity of kidney transplant recipients at baseline and 3 and 6 months after transplantation to identify contributing factors to weight gain.Design-Descriptive, correlational study using secondary data from a larger parent study examining genetic and environmental contributors to weight gain after kidney transplantation.Participants and Setting-Forty-four kidney transplant recipients at a mid-South university hospital-based transplant institute who had dietary intake, physical activity, and clinical data at baseline and 3 and 6 months were included.Main Outcome Measures-Dietary intake, physical activity, weight, and body mass index.Results-Mean weight gain increased by 6% from baseline to 6 months. Interestingly, dietary intake did not change significantly from baseline to 6 months. Hours of sleep per day decreased during the same period (P=.02). Dietary intake, physical activity, age, race, sex, and immunosuppression showed no significant relationship to weight gain at 6 months.Conclusion-Little consideration has been given to dietary intake and physical activity of kidney transplant recipients and the effects of these variables on weight gain. Further studies with a larger sample are needed, as weight gain after transplantation is a significant risk factor for diminished long-term outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-70
Number of pages9
JournalProgress in Transplantation
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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Weight Gain
Exercise
Kidney
Kidney Transplantation
Transplantation
Transplant Recipients
Immunosuppressive Agents
Immunosuppression
Life Style
Sleep
Body Mass Index
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Transplants
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Characterizing dietary intake and physical activity affecting weight gain in kidney transplant recipients. / Cupples, Connie K.; Cashion, Ann K.; Cowan, Patricia A.; Tutor, Ruth S.; Wicks, Mona; Williams, Ruth; Eason, James D.

In: Progress in Transplantation, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.03.2012, p. 62-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cupples, Connie K. ; Cashion, Ann K. ; Cowan, Patricia A. ; Tutor, Ruth S. ; Wicks, Mona ; Williams, Ruth ; Eason, James D. / Characterizing dietary intake and physical activity affecting weight gain in kidney transplant recipients. In: Progress in Transplantation. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 1. pp. 62-70.
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