Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

Which antiemetic for which therapy?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remains an important and common toxicity of cancer treatment. Recent guideline revisions have classified chemotherapeutic agents into four categories of emesis risk without the use of preventive agents: high (> 90%), moderate (30%-90%), low (10%-30%), and minimal (< 10%). Currently available antiemetic agents, including corticosteroids, 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonists, and neurokinin (NK)-1 antagonists are used alone or in combination depending on the level of emetogenic potential as prophylaxis against the development of CINV during the acute period (up to 24 hours after chemotherapy) and the delayed period (up to 5 days after treatment). Newer agents, including the second-generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonist palonosetron (Aloxi) and the NK-1 antagonist aprepitant (Emend), offer additional clinical benefit in highly and moderately emetogenic therapy. However, delayed nausea and vomiting continue to occur frequently in many patients and have an impact on quality of life. Other classes of agents including the benzodiazepines and cannabinoids offer the potential for additional protective benefit. Continued research with new drugs and combinations is necessary to meet this significant unmet need of cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)946-953
Number of pages8
JournalOncology
Volume21
Issue number8
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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Antiemetics
aprepitant
Nausea
Vomiting
Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT3
Drug Therapy
Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists
Cannabinoids
Drug Combinations
Therapeutics
Benzodiazepines
Neoplasms
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Quality of Life
Guidelines
Research
palonosetron

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting : Which antiemetic for which therapy? / Schwartzberg, Lee.

In: Oncology, Vol. 21, No. 8, 07.2007, p. 946-953.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remains an important and common toxicity of cancer treatment. Recent guideline revisions have classified chemotherapeutic agents into four categories of emesis risk without the use of preventive agents: high (> 90{\%}), moderate (30{\%}-90{\%}), low (10{\%}-30{\%}), and minimal (< 10{\%}). Currently available antiemetic agents, including corticosteroids, 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonists, and neurokinin (NK)-1 antagonists are used alone or in combination depending on the level of emetogenic potential as prophylaxis against the development of CINV during the acute period (up to 24 hours after chemotherapy) and the delayed period (up to 5 days after treatment). Newer agents, including the second-generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonist palonosetron (Aloxi) and the NK-1 antagonist aprepitant (Emend), offer additional clinical benefit in highly and moderately emetogenic therapy. However, delayed nausea and vomiting continue to occur frequently in many patients and have an impact on quality of life. Other classes of agents including the benzodiazepines and cannabinoids offer the potential for additional protective benefit. Continued research with new drugs and combinations is necessary to meet this significant unmet need of cancer patients.",
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