Chlamydia trachomatis utilizes the mammalian CLA1 lipid transporter to acquire host phosphatidylcholine essential for growth

John Cox, Yasser M. Abdelrahman, Jan Peters, Nirun Naher, Robert J. Belland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phosphatidylcholine is a constituent of Chlamydia trachomatis membranes that must be acquired from its mammalian host to support bacterial proliferation. The CLA1 (SR-B1) receptor is a bi-directional phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol transporter that is recruited to the inclusion of Chlamydia-infected cells along with ABCA1. C. trachomatis growth was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by BLT-1, a selective inhibitor of CLA1 function. Expression of a BLT-1-insensitive CLA1(C384S) mutant ameliorated the effect of the drug on chlamydial growth. CLA1 knockdown using shRNAs corroborated an important role for CLA1 in the growth of C. trachomatis. Trafficking of a fluorescent phosphatidylcholine analogue to Chlamydia was blocked by the inhibition of CLA1 or ABCA1 function, indicating a critical role for these transporters in phosphatidylcholine acquisition by this organism. Our analyses using a dual-labelled fluorescent phosphatidylcholine analogue and mass spectrometry showed that the phosphatidylcholine associated with isolated Chlamydia was unmodified host phosphatidylcholine. These results indicate that C. trachomatis co-opts host phospholipid transporters normally used to assemble lipoproteins to acquire host phosphatidylcholine essential for growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-318
Number of pages14
JournalCellular Microbiology
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Chlamydia trachomatis
Phosphatidylcholines
Lipids
Growth
Chlamydia
Lipoproteins
Mass Spectrometry
Phospholipids
Cholesterol
Membranes
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Chlamydia trachomatis utilizes the mammalian CLA1 lipid transporter to acquire host phosphatidylcholine essential for growth. / Cox, John; Abdelrahman, Yasser M.; Peters, Jan; Naher, Nirun; Belland, Robert J.

In: Cellular Microbiology, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 305-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cox, John ; Abdelrahman, Yasser M. ; Peters, Jan ; Naher, Nirun ; Belland, Robert J. / Chlamydia trachomatis utilizes the mammalian CLA1 lipid transporter to acquire host phosphatidylcholine essential for growth. In: Cellular Microbiology. 2016 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 305-318.
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