Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts as protein factories

Stephen P. Mayfield, Andrea L. Manuell, Stephen Chen, Joann Wu, Miller Tran, David Siefker, Machiko Muto, Julia Marin-Navarro

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Protein-based therapeutics are the fastest growing sector of drug development, mainly because of the high sensitivity and specificity of these molecules. Their high specificity leads to few side effects and excellent success rates in drug development. However, the inherent complexity of these molecules restricts their synthesis to living cells, making recombinant proteins expensive to produce. In addition to therapeutic uses, recombinant proteins also have a variety of industrial applications and are important research reagents. Eukaryotic algae offer the potential to produce high yields of recombinant proteins more rapidly and at much lower cost than traditional cell culture. Additionally, transgenic algae can be grown in complete containment, reducing any risk of environmental contamination. This system might also be used for the oral delivery of therapeutic proteins, as green algae are edible and do not contain endotoxins or human viral or prion contaminants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-133
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Biotechnology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

Fingerprint

Chloroplast Proteins
Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Recombinant proteins
Algae
Recombinant Proteins
Industrial plants
Proteins
Chlorophyta
Molecules
Prions
Therapeutic Uses
Cell culture
Endotoxins
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Industrial applications
Contamination
Cell Culture Techniques
Cells
Impurities
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Mayfield, S. P., Manuell, A. L., Chen, S., Wu, J., Tran, M., Siefker, D., ... Marin-Navarro, J. (2007). Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts as protein factories. Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 18(2), 126-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2007.02.001

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts as protein factories. / Mayfield, Stephen P.; Manuell, Andrea L.; Chen, Stephen; Wu, Joann; Tran, Miller; Siefker, David; Muto, Machiko; Marin-Navarro, Julia.

In: Current Opinion in Biotechnology, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.04.2007, p. 126-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mayfield, SP, Manuell, AL, Chen, S, Wu, J, Tran, M, Siefker, D, Muto, M & Marin-Navarro, J 2007, 'Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts as protein factories', Current Opinion in Biotechnology, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 126-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2007.02.001
Mayfield SP, Manuell AL, Chen S, Wu J, Tran M, Siefker D et al. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts as protein factories. Current Opinion in Biotechnology. 2007 Apr 1;18(2):126-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2007.02.001
Mayfield, Stephen P. ; Manuell, Andrea L. ; Chen, Stephen ; Wu, Joann ; Tran, Miller ; Siefker, David ; Muto, Machiko ; Marin-Navarro, Julia. / Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts as protein factories. In: Current Opinion in Biotechnology. 2007 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 126-133.
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