Choroidal blood flow in pigeons compensates for decreases in arterial blood pressure

Anton Reiner, Y. Zagvazdin, Malinda E.C. Fitzgerald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While it had once been thought that choroidal blood flow (ChBF) does not compensate for changes in perfusion pressure, recent studies have shown that ChBF in rabbits and humans does compensate for changes in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and thereby remains relatively stable within a physiological range of ABPs. In this study, we sought to determine if ChBF in birds can compensate for decreases in ABP, either spontaneously occuring or caused by blood withdrawal. ChBF was continuously monitored using laser Doppler flowmetry in anesthetized pigeons, and at the same time ABP was measured via the brachial artery. In studies of spontaneous fluctuation in ABP, ChBF and ABP were analyzed at regular intervals over a 2-3hr period, while for blood withdrawal studies, blood was transiently withdrawn via the brachial artery. In both paradigms, ChBF remained near baseline over an ABP range from basal (about 90mmHg) to about 55mmHg, followed ABP nearly linearly below 50mmHg, and showed no compensation below 40mmHg. The blood withdrawal studies further showed that the compensation was more rapid with small acute declines in ABP than with larger declines. These findings reveal that ChBF in pigeons, as in rabbits and humans, compensates for declines in ABP so as to remain relatively stable within a physiological range of ABPs. Given the phylogenetic distance between humans and rabbits on one hand and birds on the other, these results suggest that choroidal compensation for ABP declines may be a common ocular mechanism among warm-blooded vertebrates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-282
Number of pages10
JournalExperimental Eye Research
Volume76
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

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Columbidae
Arterial Pressure
Brachial Artery
Rabbits
Birds
Laser-Doppler Flowmetry
Vertebrates
Perfusion
Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Choroidal blood flow in pigeons compensates for decreases in arterial blood pressure. / Reiner, Anton; Zagvazdin, Y.; Fitzgerald, Malinda E.C.

In: Experimental Eye Research, Vol. 76, No. 3, 01.03.2003, p. 273-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reiner, Anton ; Zagvazdin, Y. ; Fitzgerald, Malinda E.C. / Choroidal blood flow in pigeons compensates for decreases in arterial blood pressure. In: Experimental Eye Research. 2003 ; Vol. 76, No. 3. pp. 273-282.
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