Chronic helminth infections impair pneumococcal vaccine responses

Nopporn Apiwattanakul, Paul G. Thomas, Amy R. Iverson, Jonathan Mccullers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pneumonia is the leading killer of children and disproportionately affects developing countries. Vaccination campaigns against Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of pneumonia, have recently been launched with a new conjugate vaccine in Africa. Using a mouse model, we assessed the potential role that the high burden of helminth infections in the countries targeted for vaccine might have on vaccine effectiveness. Mice vaccinated with either commercial conjugate or purified polysaccharide vaccines had impaired antibody responses if they were chronically infected with Taenia crassiceps. This translated to increased susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia and high mortality compared to helminth-negative vaccinated animals, which were fully protected from disease and death. Antibodies taken from Taenia-infected, vaccinated mice were unable to effectively opsonize S. pneumoniae for killing by alveolar macrophages, and did not protect against pneumococcal challenge when adoptively transferred into naïve animals. These data may have implications for vaccination programs in countries endemic with helminths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5405-5410
Number of pages6
JournalVaccine
Volume32
Issue number42
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

helminthiasis
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Helminths
Taenia
Vaccines
pneumonia
vaccines
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Pneumonia
Infection
helminths
Pneumococcal Pneumonia
Immunization Programs
Conjugate Vaccines
vaccination
Alveolar Macrophages
Taenia crassiceps
Developing Countries
antibodies
Antibody Formation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Chronic helminth infections impair pneumococcal vaccine responses. / Apiwattanakul, Nopporn; Thomas, Paul G.; Iverson, Amy R.; Mccullers, Jonathan.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 32, No. 42, 01.01.2014, p. 5405-5410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Apiwattanakul, Nopporn ; Thomas, Paul G. ; Iverson, Amy R. ; Mccullers, Jonathan. / Chronic helminth infections impair pneumococcal vaccine responses. In: Vaccine. 2014 ; Vol. 32, No. 42. pp. 5405-5410.
@article{718e25eb9fb849bd886d2dbc04e80a79,
title = "Chronic helminth infections impair pneumococcal vaccine responses",
abstract = "Pneumonia is the leading killer of children and disproportionately affects developing countries. Vaccination campaigns against Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of pneumonia, have recently been launched with a new conjugate vaccine in Africa. Using a mouse model, we assessed the potential role that the high burden of helminth infections in the countries targeted for vaccine might have on vaccine effectiveness. Mice vaccinated with either commercial conjugate or purified polysaccharide vaccines had impaired antibody responses if they were chronically infected with Taenia crassiceps. This translated to increased susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia and high mortality compared to helminth-negative vaccinated animals, which were fully protected from disease and death. Antibodies taken from Taenia-infected, vaccinated mice were unable to effectively opsonize S. pneumoniae for killing by alveolar macrophages, and did not protect against pneumococcal challenge when adoptively transferred into na{\"i}ve animals. These data may have implications for vaccination programs in countries endemic with helminths.",
author = "Nopporn Apiwattanakul and Thomas, {Paul G.} and Iverson, {Amy R.} and Jonathan Mccullers",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.07.107",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "5405--5410",
journal = "Vaccine",
issn = "0264-410X",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "42",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronic helminth infections impair pneumococcal vaccine responses

AU - Apiwattanakul, Nopporn

AU - Thomas, Paul G.

AU - Iverson, Amy R.

AU - Mccullers, Jonathan

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Pneumonia is the leading killer of children and disproportionately affects developing countries. Vaccination campaigns against Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of pneumonia, have recently been launched with a new conjugate vaccine in Africa. Using a mouse model, we assessed the potential role that the high burden of helminth infections in the countries targeted for vaccine might have on vaccine effectiveness. Mice vaccinated with either commercial conjugate or purified polysaccharide vaccines had impaired antibody responses if they were chronically infected with Taenia crassiceps. This translated to increased susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia and high mortality compared to helminth-negative vaccinated animals, which were fully protected from disease and death. Antibodies taken from Taenia-infected, vaccinated mice were unable to effectively opsonize S. pneumoniae for killing by alveolar macrophages, and did not protect against pneumococcal challenge when adoptively transferred into naïve animals. These data may have implications for vaccination programs in countries endemic with helminths.

AB - Pneumonia is the leading killer of children and disproportionately affects developing countries. Vaccination campaigns against Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of pneumonia, have recently been launched with a new conjugate vaccine in Africa. Using a mouse model, we assessed the potential role that the high burden of helminth infections in the countries targeted for vaccine might have on vaccine effectiveness. Mice vaccinated with either commercial conjugate or purified polysaccharide vaccines had impaired antibody responses if they were chronically infected with Taenia crassiceps. This translated to increased susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia and high mortality compared to helminth-negative vaccinated animals, which were fully protected from disease and death. Antibodies taken from Taenia-infected, vaccinated mice were unable to effectively opsonize S. pneumoniae for killing by alveolar macrophages, and did not protect against pneumococcal challenge when adoptively transferred into naïve animals. These data may have implications for vaccination programs in countries endemic with helminths.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84922406424&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84922406424&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.07.107

DO - 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.07.107

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 5405

EP - 5410

JO - Vaccine

JF - Vaccine

SN - 0264-410X

IS - 42

ER -