Chronic idiopathic neutrophilia

Experience and recommendations

Alva Weir, James B. Lewis, Rafael Arteta-Bulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To distinguish chronic idiopathic neutrophilia (CIN) in a cost-effective manner from neutrophilia caused by important underlying illnesses. Methods: This was a retrospective review of patients visiting a Veterans Affairs Medical Center over the last 10 years with a diagnosis of leukocytosis or myeloproliferative disorder. Of this group, fifty-seven patients from 1999 to 2008 were identified with CIN. Clinical and laboratory parameters were examined to identify CIN and establish its course. Eighty-one patients who presented from 2005 to 2010 with myeloproliferative disorders were also studied at time of diagnosis to determine any possible confusion with CIN. Results: The patients with CIN were followed for a mean of ≥7.3 years without progression to other serious disorders. Compared to non-CIN patients evaluated for neutrophilia, in multiple logistic regression analyses, smoking (P = .001) and increased BMI (P = .004) were significantly associated with CIN. No CIN patient developed a clinically apparent myeloproliferative disorder other than chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Of the patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms reviewed at the time of their initial diagnosis, only CML occasionally presented with a picture consistent with CIN. For nonsmokers, the BMI of CIN patients was significantly higher than the average VA population (P < .001). Conclusion: Cigarette smoking and obesity are confirmed as factors associated with CIN and may be causative. CIN is unlikely to develop into a clinically recognizable myeloproliferative neoplasm other than CML. Cost-effective guidelines for the diagnostic evaluation of neutrophilia in otherwise healthy patients are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-504
Number of pages6
JournalSouthern medical journal
Volume104
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

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Myeloproliferative Disorders
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive
Smoking
Costs and Cost Analysis
Leukocytosis
Veterans
Neoplasms
Obesity
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Guidelines
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chronic idiopathic neutrophilia : Experience and recommendations. / Weir, Alva; Lewis, James B.; Arteta-Bulos, Rafael.

In: Southern medical journal, Vol. 104, No. 7, 01.07.2011, p. 499-504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weir, Alva ; Lewis, James B. ; Arteta-Bulos, Rafael. / Chronic idiopathic neutrophilia : Experience and recommendations. In: Southern medical journal. 2011 ; Vol. 104, No. 7. pp. 499-504.
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