Chronic self-administration of nicotine in rats impairs T cell responsiveness

Roma Kalra, Shashi P. Singh, Dean Kracko, Shannon G. Matta, Burt Sharp, Mohan L. Sopori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic exposure of rodents to nicotine via subcutaneously or intracerebroventricularly implanted miniosmotic pumps affects T cell function. However, this method of continuous nicotine administration does not replicate the self-motivated administration of nicotine in human smokers. To determine whether nicotine impairs the immune system under conditions pertinent to human smokers, we investigated the T cell responsiveness of male Lewis rats self-administering (SA) nicotine (0.03 mg/kg of body weight per injection) 40 to 50 times/day for 5 weeks, using a model of virtually unlimited access to nicotine. Compared with sham control animals, the concanavalin A-induced proliferation of spleen cells from SA rats was significantly decreased. Moreover, the ability of spleen cells to mobilize intracellular Ca2+; after ligation of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) with an anti-αβ TCR antibody was significantly less in SA than in control rats. In addition, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores were markedly depleted in spleen cells from SA animals. These results suggest that chronic nicotine self-administration suppresses T cell responsiveness, and this suppression may result from an impaired TCR-mediated signaling that stems from the depletion of IP3-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)935-939
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Volume302
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2002

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Self Administration
Nicotine
T-Lymphocytes
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Spleen
Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate
Concanavalin A
Ligation
Immune System
Rodentia
Body Weight
Cell Proliferation
Injections
Antibodies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Chronic self-administration of nicotine in rats impairs T cell responsiveness. / Kalra, Roma; Singh, Shashi P.; Kracko, Dean; Matta, Shannon G.; Sharp, Burt; Sopori, Mohan L.

In: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Vol. 302, No. 3, 01.09.2002, p. 935-939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kalra, Roma ; Singh, Shashi P. ; Kracko, Dean ; Matta, Shannon G. ; Sharp, Burt ; Sopori, Mohan L. / Chronic self-administration of nicotine in rats impairs T cell responsiveness. In: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. 2002 ; Vol. 302, No. 3. pp. 935-939.
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