Cigarette smoking as a dieting strategy in a university population

Robert Klesges, Lisa M. Klesges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

153 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study sought to determine the prevalence of smoking as a dieting strategy in a university population. There were 1076 people (458 males, 618 females) asked (1) the types of strategies they used to curb hunger (including smoking) and (2) whether they either began smoking or were currently smoking as a weight loss/maintenance strategy. Results indicated that 32.5% of all smokers (n = 209; 39% of females, 25% of males) reported using smoking as a weight loss strategy. A small percentage of smokers (10% of males, 5% of females) reported beginning to smoke for weight control. Overweight females were much more likely, however, to report that they started smoking for dieting reasons. Females were much more likely to report weight gain as a relapse variable than males. It is concluded that weight gain following smoking cessation, particularly among females, may be a significant relapse variable as well as a significant barrier to smoking cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-419
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Smoking
Population
Smoking Cessation
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Recurrence
Hunger
Smoke
Maintenance
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Cigarette smoking as a dieting strategy in a university population. / Klesges, Robert; Klesges, Lisa M.

In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, Vol. 7, No. 3, 01.01.1988, p. 413-419.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klesges, Robert ; Klesges, Lisa M. / Cigarette smoking as a dieting strategy in a university population. In: International Journal of Eating Disorders. 1988 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 413-419.
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