Clinical and acoustical variability in hypokinetic dysarthria

E. Metter, Wayne R. Hanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ten male patients with parkinsonism secondary to Parkinson's disease or progressive supranuclear palsy had clinical neurological, speech, and acoustical speech evaluations. In addition, seven of the patients were evaluated by x-ray computed tomography (CT) and (F-18)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Extensive variability of speech features, both clinical and acoustical, were found and seemed to be independent of the severity of any parkinsonian sign, CT, or FDG PET. In addition, little relationship existed between the variability across each measured speech feature. What appeared to be important for the appearance of abnormal acoustic measures was the degree of overall severity of the dysarthria. These observations suggest that a better understanding of hypokinetic dysarthria may result from more extensive examination of the variability between patients. Emphasizing a specific feature such as rapid speaking rate in characterizing hypokinetic dysarthria focuses on a single and inconstant finding in a complex speech pattern.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-366
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Communication Disorders
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

Fingerprint

Dysarthria
Positron-Emission Tomography
Secondary Parkinson Disease
Tomography
Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Parkinsonian Disorders
Acoustics
acoustics
speaking
X-Rays
Disease
examination
evaluation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

Clinical and acoustical variability in hypokinetic dysarthria. / Metter, E.; Hanson, Wayne R.

In: Journal of Communication Disorders, Vol. 19, No. 5, 01.01.1986, p. 347-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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