Clinical and imaging correlations of generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity in human EEG recordings, during alertness

Serafeim Katsavos, Artemios Artemiadis, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Evangelia Kararizou, Georgios Papadopoulos, Nikolaos Triantafyllou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: In a considerable percentage of individuals with a detectable alpha rhythm in their EEG, bursts of generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity (GHSAA) may occur, during alertness. The aim of this study was to examine whether appearance of GHSAA, which probably generates from transcortical circuitry, shows any correlation with demographic characteristics, underlying normal or abnormal pathophysiology, or substances in use. Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed 441 EEG recordings performed in their laboratory during a 1-year period for presence of GHSAA, concomitantly collecting data that concerned symptoms, diagnosis, imaging, medication, and demographics. Recordings in mental states other than alertness were excluded from the sample. Results: Generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity was found in 22.95% of the study population. Its occurrence was diminished in male gender (P , 0.001), older age (Kendall tau, 0.16; P , 0.0001), and disorders involving structural abnormalities like brain lesions or neurodegeneration (P , 0.02). Dementia, Parkinson disease, and psychoses showed individually a trend towards lower GHSAA presence. Conclusions: In the sample, the presence of GHSAA was commonly observed in the cohort of patients without abnormalities in their neuroimaging studies. Generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity is a finding of youth and requires a properly functioning cerebral cortex in order to emerge. Female preponderance may signify underlying trangender differences in alpha rhythm generators. These preliminary results indicate that the significance of GHSAA alterations deserves more thorough evaluation in larger groups of patients suffering from a variety of different neuropsychiatric disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-418
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Neurophysiology
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Alpha Rhythm
Human Activities
Electroencephalography
Demography
Neuroimaging
Cerebral Cortex
Psychotic Disorders
Parkinson Disease
Dementia
Brain
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Clinical and imaging correlations of generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity in human EEG recordings, during alertness. / Katsavos, Serafeim; Artemiadis, Artemios; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kararizou, Evangelia; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos.

In: Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 32, No. 5, 01.01.2015, p. 413-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katsavos, Serafeim ; Artemiadis, Artemios ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Kararizou, Evangelia ; Papadopoulos, Georgios ; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos. / Clinical and imaging correlations of generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity in human EEG recordings, during alertness. In: Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology. 2015 ; Vol. 32, No. 5. pp. 413-418.
@article{3376173be29542c7a206d9b62b382972,
title = "Clinical and imaging correlations of generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity in human EEG recordings, during alertness",
abstract = "Purpose: In a considerable percentage of individuals with a detectable alpha rhythm in their EEG, bursts of generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity (GHSAA) may occur, during alertness. The aim of this study was to examine whether appearance of GHSAA, which probably generates from transcortical circuitry, shows any correlation with demographic characteristics, underlying normal or abnormal pathophysiology, or substances in use. Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed 441 EEG recordings performed in their laboratory during a 1-year period for presence of GHSAA, concomitantly collecting data that concerned symptoms, diagnosis, imaging, medication, and demographics. Recordings in mental states other than alertness were excluded from the sample. Results: Generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity was found in 22.95{\%} of the study population. Its occurrence was diminished in male gender (P , 0.001), older age (Kendall tau, 0.16; P , 0.0001), and disorders involving structural abnormalities like brain lesions or neurodegeneration (P , 0.02). Dementia, Parkinson disease, and psychoses showed individually a trend towards lower GHSAA presence. Conclusions: In the sample, the presence of GHSAA was commonly observed in the cohort of patients without abnormalities in their neuroimaging studies. Generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity is a finding of youth and requires a properly functioning cerebral cortex in order to emerge. Female preponderance may signify underlying trangender differences in alpha rhythm generators. These preliminary results indicate that the significance of GHSAA alterations deserves more thorough evaluation in larger groups of patients suffering from a variety of different neuropsychiatric disorders.",
author = "Serafeim Katsavos and Artemios Artemiadis and Georgios Tsivgoulis and Evangelia Kararizou and Georgios Papadopoulos and Nikolaos Triantafyllou",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/WNP.0000000000000191",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "413--418",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology",
issn = "0736-0258",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical and imaging correlations of generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity in human EEG recordings, during alertness

AU - Katsavos, Serafeim

AU - Artemiadis, Artemios

AU - Tsivgoulis, Georgios

AU - Kararizou, Evangelia

AU - Papadopoulos, Georgios

AU - Triantafyllou, Nikolaos

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Purpose: In a considerable percentage of individuals with a detectable alpha rhythm in their EEG, bursts of generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity (GHSAA) may occur, during alertness. The aim of this study was to examine whether appearance of GHSAA, which probably generates from transcortical circuitry, shows any correlation with demographic characteristics, underlying normal or abnormal pathophysiology, or substances in use. Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed 441 EEG recordings performed in their laboratory during a 1-year period for presence of GHSAA, concomitantly collecting data that concerned symptoms, diagnosis, imaging, medication, and demographics. Recordings in mental states other than alertness were excluded from the sample. Results: Generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity was found in 22.95% of the study population. Its occurrence was diminished in male gender (P , 0.001), older age (Kendall tau, 0.16; P , 0.0001), and disorders involving structural abnormalities like brain lesions or neurodegeneration (P , 0.02). Dementia, Parkinson disease, and psychoses showed individually a trend towards lower GHSAA presence. Conclusions: In the sample, the presence of GHSAA was commonly observed in the cohort of patients without abnormalities in their neuroimaging studies. Generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity is a finding of youth and requires a properly functioning cerebral cortex in order to emerge. Female preponderance may signify underlying trangender differences in alpha rhythm generators. These preliminary results indicate that the significance of GHSAA alterations deserves more thorough evaluation in larger groups of patients suffering from a variety of different neuropsychiatric disorders.

AB - Purpose: In a considerable percentage of individuals with a detectable alpha rhythm in their EEG, bursts of generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity (GHSAA) may occur, during alertness. The aim of this study was to examine whether appearance of GHSAA, which probably generates from transcortical circuitry, shows any correlation with demographic characteristics, underlying normal or abnormal pathophysiology, or substances in use. Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed 441 EEG recordings performed in their laboratory during a 1-year period for presence of GHSAA, concomitantly collecting data that concerned symptoms, diagnosis, imaging, medication, and demographics. Recordings in mental states other than alertness were excluded from the sample. Results: Generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity was found in 22.95% of the study population. Its occurrence was diminished in male gender (P , 0.001), older age (Kendall tau, 0.16; P , 0.0001), and disorders involving structural abnormalities like brain lesions or neurodegeneration (P , 0.02). Dementia, Parkinson disease, and psychoses showed individually a trend towards lower GHSAA presence. Conclusions: In the sample, the presence of GHSAA was commonly observed in the cohort of patients without abnormalities in their neuroimaging studies. Generalized hypersynchronous alpha activity is a finding of youth and requires a properly functioning cerebral cortex in order to emerge. Female preponderance may signify underlying trangender differences in alpha rhythm generators. These preliminary results indicate that the significance of GHSAA alterations deserves more thorough evaluation in larger groups of patients suffering from a variety of different neuropsychiatric disorders.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84943166861&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84943166861&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/WNP.0000000000000191

DO - 10.1097/WNP.0000000000000191

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 413

EP - 418

JO - Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology

JF - Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology

SN - 0736-0258

IS - 5

ER -