Clinical features and antimicrobial resistance profiles of important Enterobacteriaceae pathogens in Guangzhou representative of Southern China, 2001–2015

Jinhong Xie, Brian Peters, Bing Li, Lin Li, Guangchao Yu, Zhenbo Xu, Mark E. Shirtliff

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26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object This surveillance aimed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Enterobacteriaceae pathogens in Southern China during 2001–2015. Methods A total of 6858 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were collected, including 4276 E. coli, 1992 K. pneumoniae and 590 Enterobacter spp. Disk diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentrations method were used for susceptibility testing, with results interpreted by the CLSI (2015). Results Urinary tract remained the dominant isolated site among E. coli (49.88%), whereas 53.26% K. pneumoniae and 45.25% Enterobacter spp. were from Sputum. The carbapenems maintained the highest antimicrobial activity (resistance rates <15%), followed by piperacillin-tazobactam and amikacin. Gentle increases were obtained in carbapenems-resistant K. pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. (eg. from 4.5% to 11.2% and 3.2% to 14.5% in imipenem, repestively). The third-generation cephalosporins showed high and stable resistance among Enterobacteriaceae pathogens during the studied period, with ceftazidime as the most active third-generation cephalosporin against Enterobacteriaceae. Isolates from ICU department showed higher or similar resistance rates among Enterobacteriaceae pathogens compared to other wards. Conclusion Carbapenems are the most potent antibiotic agents against Enterobacteriaceae pathogens. Due to the complicated susceptibility profiles, prescribing guidelines should be based on the knowledge of antibiogram of pathogens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-211
Number of pages6
JournalMicrobial Pathogenesis
Volume107
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Enterobacteriaceae
China
Enterobacter
Carbapenems
Pneumonia
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Cephalosporins
Escherichia coli
Ceftazidime
Amikacin
Imipenem
Sputum
Urinary Tract
Guidelines
Anti-Bacterial Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Clinical features and antimicrobial resistance profiles of important Enterobacteriaceae pathogens in Guangzhou representative of Southern China, 2001–2015. / Xie, Jinhong; Peters, Brian; Li, Bing; Li, Lin; Yu, Guangchao; Xu, Zhenbo; Shirtliff, Mark E.

In: Microbial Pathogenesis, Vol. 107, 01.06.2017, p. 206-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Object This surveillance aimed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Enterobacteriaceae pathogens in Southern China during 2001–2015. Methods A total of 6858 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were collected, including 4276 E. coli, 1992 K. pneumoniae and 590 Enterobacter spp. Disk diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentrations method were used for susceptibility testing, with results interpreted by the CLSI (2015). Results Urinary tract remained the dominant isolated site among E. coli (49.88{\%}), whereas 53.26{\%} K. pneumoniae and 45.25{\%} Enterobacter spp. were from Sputum. The carbapenems maintained the highest antimicrobial activity (resistance rates <15{\%}), followed by piperacillin-tazobactam and amikacin. Gentle increases were obtained in carbapenems-resistant K. pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. (eg. from 4.5{\%} to 11.2{\%} and 3.2{\%} to 14.5{\%} in imipenem, repestively). The third-generation cephalosporins showed high and stable resistance among Enterobacteriaceae pathogens during the studied period, with ceftazidime as the most active third-generation cephalosporin against Enterobacteriaceae. Isolates from ICU department showed higher or similar resistance rates among Enterobacteriaceae pathogens compared to other wards. Conclusion Carbapenems are the most potent antibiotic agents against Enterobacteriaceae pathogens. Due to the complicated susceptibility profiles, prescribing guidelines should be based on the knowledge of antibiogram of pathogens.",
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