Clinical integration of picture archiving and communication systems with pathology and hospital information system in oncology

Lisa Duncan, Keith Gray, James Lewis, John Bell, Jeremy Bigge, J. Mark McKinney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The complexity of our current healthcare delivery system has become an impediment to communication among caregivers resulting in fragmentation of patient care. To address these issues, many hospitals are implementing processes to facilitate clinical integration in an effort to improve patient care and safety. Clinical informatics, including image storage in a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), represents a tool whereby clinical integration can be accomplished. In this study, we obtained intraoperative photographs of 19 cases to document clinical stage, extent of disease, disease recurrence, reconstruction/grafting, intraoperative findings not identified by preoperative imaging, and site verification as part of the Universal Protocol. Photographs from all cases were stored and viewed in PACS. Images from many of the cases were presented at our interdepartmental cancer conferences. The stored images improved communication among caregivers and preserved pertinent intraoperative findings in the patients' electronic medical record. In the future, pathology, gastroenterology, pulmonology, dermatology, and cardiology are just a few other subspecialties which could accomplish image storage in PACS. Multidisciplinary image storage in a PACS epitomizes the concept of clinical integration and its goal of improving patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)982-986
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume76
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

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Radiology Information Systems
Hospital Information Systems
Pathology
Patient Care
Caregivers
Communication
Delivery of Health Care
Medical Informatics
Pulmonary Medicine
Electronic Health Records
Gastroenterology
Patient Safety
Dermatology
Cardiology
Recurrence
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Clinical integration of picture archiving and communication systems with pathology and hospital information system in oncology. / Duncan, Lisa; Gray, Keith; Lewis, James; Bell, John; Bigge, Jeremy; McKinney, J. Mark.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 76, No. 9, 01.09.2010, p. 982-986.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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