Clinical outcome as assessed by anthropometric parameters, albumin, and cellular immune function in high-risk infants receiving parenteral nutrition

Richard Helms, Jane L. Miller, Gilbert J. Burckart, Robert G. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twelve infants with underlying gastrointestinal tract disorders receiving 16 courses of total parenteral nutrition were retrospectively studied. Statification according to calorie intake provided the best means for discriminating among different outcomes. Infants receiving greater than 110 calories/kg/d experienced significantly greater increases in weight, mid-arm muscle circumference, and triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses than did infants receiving less than 110 calories/kg/d. Catch-up growth was only seen in infants with intakes of greater than 110 calories/kg/d. In nine of these 12 infants, in vitro cellular immune parameters were assayed. Infants in both the high- and low-calorie groups experienced similar increases in transformational responses to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and in the percentage of peripheral blood T lymphocytes. No increase in serum albumin was seen regardless of calorie intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)564-569
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of pediatric surgery
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

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Parenteral Nutrition
Albumins
Pokeweed Mitogens
Skinfold Thickness
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Phytohemagglutinins
Serum Albumin
Gastrointestinal Tract
T-Lymphocytes
Weights and Measures
Muscles
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Clinical outcome as assessed by anthropometric parameters, albumin, and cellular immune function in high-risk infants receiving parenteral nutrition. / Helms, Richard; Miller, Jane L.; Burckart, Gilbert J.; Allen, Robert G.

In: Journal of pediatric surgery, Vol. 18, No. 5, 01.01.1983, p. 564-569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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