Clinical outcomes associated with pharmacist involvement in patients with dyslipidemia

A review

L. Brian Cross, Andrea Franks

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The burden of cardiovascular disease in America continues to be the leading cause of death and costs significantly more to treat ($US298.2 billion in 2002) than any other disease in the US healthcare system. Incontrovertible evidence links elevated levels of total and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol with an increased risk for coronary heart disease. The subsequent treatment of hyperlipidemia has been shown to dramatically decrease morbidity and mortality related to cardiovascular disease. Research continues to show that many candidates for lipid-lowering therapy are not offered therapy and many never attain recommended National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) guideline goals. Increased pharmacist involvement in the treatment of patients with hyperlipidemia may represent one way to help bridge the treatment gap that exists in these high-risk patients. Limited evidence has shown that lipid values, NCEP goal attainment, and medication compliance improve when a pharmacist contributes to patient care in dyslipidemia. However, larger randomized controlled studies need to be performed to confirm the results of previous smaller retrospective trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-42
Number of pages12
JournalDisease Management and Health Outcomes
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2005

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Dyslipidemias
Pharmacists
Hyperlipidemias
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cholesterol
Lipids
Therapeutics
Education
Medication Adherence
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Coronary Disease
Cause of Death
Patient Care
Guidelines
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Clinical outcomes associated with pharmacist involvement in patients with dyslipidemia : A review. / Cross, L. Brian; Franks, Andrea.

In: Disease Management and Health Outcomes, Vol. 13, No. 1, 15.02.2005, p. 31-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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