Clinical significance of in vivo cytarabine-induced gene expression signature in AML

Jatinder K. Lamba, Stanley Pounds, Xueyuan Cao, Kristine R. Crews, Christopher R. Cogle, Neha Bhise, Susana C. Raimondi, James R. Downing, Sharyn D. Baker, Raul C. Ribeiro, Jeffrey E. Rubnitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite initial remission, ∼60-70% of adult and 30% of pediatric patients experience relapse or refractory AML. Studies so far have identified base line gene expression profiles of pathogenic and prognostic significance in AML; however, the extent of change in gene expression post-initiation of treatment has not been investigated. Exposure of leukemic cells to chemotherapeutic agents such as cytarabine, a mainstay of AML chemotherapy, can trigger adaptive response by influencing leukemic cell transcriptome and, hence, development of resistance or refractory disease. It is, however, challenging to perform such a study due to lack of availability of specimens post-drug treatment. The primary objective of this study was to identify in vivo cytarabine-induced changes in leukemia cell transcriptome and to evaluate their impact on clinical outcome. The results highlight genes relevant to cytarabine resistance and support the concept of targeting cytarabine-induced genes as a means of improving response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)909-920
Number of pages12
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2016

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Cytarabine
Transcriptome
Genes
Leukemia
Pediatrics
Gene Expression
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Lamba, J. K., Pounds, S., Cao, X., Crews, K. R., Cogle, C. R., Bhise, N., ... Rubnitz, J. E. (2016). Clinical significance of in vivo cytarabine-induced gene expression signature in AML. Leukemia and Lymphoma, 57(4), 909-920. https://doi.org/10.3109/10428194.2015.1086918

Clinical significance of in vivo cytarabine-induced gene expression signature in AML. / Lamba, Jatinder K.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Crews, Kristine R.; Cogle, Christopher R.; Bhise, Neha; Raimondi, Susana C.; Downing, James R.; Baker, Sharyn D.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.

In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, Vol. 57, No. 4, 02.04.2016, p. 909-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lamba, JK, Pounds, S, Cao, X, Crews, KR, Cogle, CR, Bhise, N, Raimondi, SC, Downing, JR, Baker, SD, Ribeiro, RC & Rubnitz, JE 2016, 'Clinical significance of in vivo cytarabine-induced gene expression signature in AML', Leukemia and Lymphoma, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 909-920. https://doi.org/10.3109/10428194.2015.1086918
Lamba, Jatinder K. ; Pounds, Stanley ; Cao, Xueyuan ; Crews, Kristine R. ; Cogle, Christopher R. ; Bhise, Neha ; Raimondi, Susana C. ; Downing, James R. ; Baker, Sharyn D. ; Ribeiro, Raul C. ; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E. / Clinical significance of in vivo cytarabine-induced gene expression signature in AML. In: Leukemia and Lymphoma. 2016 ; Vol. 57, No. 4. pp. 909-920.
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