Clobazam

A newly approved but well-established drug for the treatment of intractable epilepsy syndromes

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clobazam, a 1,5-benzodiazepine, was introduced in the 1970s as an anxiolytic and antiepileptic drug. Despite worldwide usage, it was only recently approved in the United States (seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome). This article reviews historical and recent data to help practitioners better understand clobazam's clinical properties and usage. In many clinical trials, open-label studies, and retrospective reviews, clobazam was generally associated with ≥50% seizure reduction for more than half of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome patients, with approximately 10% achieving freedom from drop attacks. Efficacy is persistent, with little evidence for development of tolerance. Clobazam's safety profile appears to be similar to that of other benzodiazepines, but with substantially decreased sedation and increased psychomotor performance. Studies suggest clobazam acts through potentiation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in a manner similar to other benzodiazepines. However, clobazam appears to display greater selectivity for receptors responsible for anticonvulsant activity than for those involved in sedation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-229
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of child neurology
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2013

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Benzodiazepines
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Anticonvulsants
Seizures
Therapeutics
Psychomotor Performance
GABA Receptors
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Syncope
clobazam
Drug Resistant Epilepsy
Retrospective Studies
Clinical Trials
Safety
Lennox Gastaut Syndrome

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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abstract = "Clobazam, a 1,5-benzodiazepine, was introduced in the 1970s as an anxiolytic and antiepileptic drug. Despite worldwide usage, it was only recently approved in the United States (seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome). This article reviews historical and recent data to help practitioners better understand clobazam's clinical properties and usage. In many clinical trials, open-label studies, and retrospective reviews, clobazam was generally associated with ≥50{\%} seizure reduction for more than half of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome patients, with approximately 10{\%} achieving freedom from drop attacks. Efficacy is persistent, with little evidence for development of tolerance. Clobazam's safety profile appears to be similar to that of other benzodiazepines, but with substantially decreased sedation and increased psychomotor performance. Studies suggest clobazam acts through potentiation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in a manner similar to other benzodiazepines. However, clobazam appears to display greater selectivity for receptors responsible for anticonvulsant activity than for those involved in sedation.",
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N2 - Clobazam, a 1,5-benzodiazepine, was introduced in the 1970s as an anxiolytic and antiepileptic drug. Despite worldwide usage, it was only recently approved in the United States (seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome). This article reviews historical and recent data to help practitioners better understand clobazam's clinical properties and usage. In many clinical trials, open-label studies, and retrospective reviews, clobazam was generally associated with ≥50% seizure reduction for more than half of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome patients, with approximately 10% achieving freedom from drop attacks. Efficacy is persistent, with little evidence for development of tolerance. Clobazam's safety profile appears to be similar to that of other benzodiazepines, but with substantially decreased sedation and increased psychomotor performance. Studies suggest clobazam acts through potentiation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in a manner similar to other benzodiazepines. However, clobazam appears to display greater selectivity for receptors responsible for anticonvulsant activity than for those involved in sedation.

AB - Clobazam, a 1,5-benzodiazepine, was introduced in the 1970s as an anxiolytic and antiepileptic drug. Despite worldwide usage, it was only recently approved in the United States (seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome). This article reviews historical and recent data to help practitioners better understand clobazam's clinical properties and usage. In many clinical trials, open-label studies, and retrospective reviews, clobazam was generally associated with ≥50% seizure reduction for more than half of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome patients, with approximately 10% achieving freedom from drop attacks. Efficacy is persistent, with little evidence for development of tolerance. Clobazam's safety profile appears to be similar to that of other benzodiazepines, but with substantially decreased sedation and increased psychomotor performance. Studies suggest clobazam acts through potentiation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in a manner similar to other benzodiazepines. However, clobazam appears to display greater selectivity for receptors responsible for anticonvulsant activity than for those involved in sedation.

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