Cocaine intoxication presenting as preeclampsia and eclampsia

Craig Towers, Richard A. Pircon, Michael P. Nageotte, Manuel Porto, Thomas J. Garite

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To relate the clinical presentation of acute cocaine intoxication in the third trimester to preeclampsia and eclampsia. Methods: Eleven women presented to Long Beach Memorial Women’s Hospital and the University of California, Irvine Medical Center with hypertension and clinical symptoms of headache, blurred vision, abdominal pain, or seizures in the third trimester of pregnancy. Each had a positive urine drug screen for cocaine. The laboratory evaluation for preeclampsia included a complete blood count, platelet count, uric acid, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatinine, and urine for protein content. Results: All women had a diastolic blood pressure of at least 90 mmHg, which returned to the normal range 45-90 minutes after admission. Each presented with one or more symptoms associated with preeclampsia, which ultimately improved as the drug wore off. In addition, all laboratory evaluations for preeclampsia were negative. Conclusion: If a patient presents in the third trimester with hypertension and clinical symptoms of preeclampsia that rapidly improve shortly after admission, cocaine intoxication should be considered as the possible source.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)545-547
Number of pages3
JournalObstetrics and gynecology
Volume81
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Eclampsia
Pre-Eclampsia
Cocaine
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Urine
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Blood Cell Count
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Uric Acid
Alanine Transaminase
Platelet Count
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Abdominal Pain
Headache
Creatinine
Reference Values
Seizures
Blood Platelets
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Towers, C., Pircon, R. A., Nageotte, M. P., Porto, M., & Garite, T. J. (1993). Cocaine intoxication presenting as preeclampsia and eclampsia. Obstetrics and gynecology, 81(4), 545-547.

Cocaine intoxication presenting as preeclampsia and eclampsia. / Towers, Craig; Pircon, Richard A.; Nageotte, Michael P.; Porto, Manuel; Garite, Thomas J.

In: Obstetrics and gynecology, Vol. 81, No. 4, 01.01.1993, p. 545-547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Towers, C, Pircon, RA, Nageotte, MP, Porto, M & Garite, TJ 1993, 'Cocaine intoxication presenting as preeclampsia and eclampsia', Obstetrics and gynecology, vol. 81, no. 4, pp. 545-547.
Towers C, Pircon RA, Nageotte MP, Porto M, Garite TJ. Cocaine intoxication presenting as preeclampsia and eclampsia. Obstetrics and gynecology. 1993 Jan 1;81(4):545-547.
Towers, Craig ; Pircon, Richard A. ; Nageotte, Michael P. ; Porto, Manuel ; Garite, Thomas J. / Cocaine intoxication presenting as preeclampsia and eclampsia. In: Obstetrics and gynecology. 1993 ; Vol. 81, No. 4. pp. 545-547.
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